Seeking action and resolution with art, performance

Listen to the Tuesday, Oct. 9 Artwaves for continued coverage of the premier Against the Wind Festival , created by local volunteers to draw attention to the danger of nuclear proliferation as well as raise money for the multiple-year voyage of the Golden Rule "peace boat." The festival will be held this Sunday, Oct. 14 through Sunday, Oct. 21. Wendy Butler speaks with John Heckel who directs the festival's centerpiece, the 1959 play "Which Way the Wind?" with performances Oct. 19-21 at Arcata Playhouse. Also on the Oct. 9 Artwaves is an interview with Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy, who speaks about the Sing Our Rivers Red traveling earring exhibition at the HSU Goudi’ni Gallery. SORR’s events seek to “bring awareness to the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women and colonial gender-based violence” across North America. There are also connected events occurring with this exhibit including a Sewing Circle tomorrow (Wednesday) at 10 a.m. and Thursday at 2 p.m. and a Gallery Talk this Friday, Oct. 12 at noon. Phone the gallery office at (707) 826-3629, email hsugalleries@gmail.com or bs228@humboldt.edu for more information.

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You've probably heard that a little booze a day is good for you. I've even said it at parties. "Look at the French," I've said gleefully over my own cup. "Wine all the time and they still live to be not a day younger than 82."

I'm sorry to say we're probably wrong. The evidence that alcohol has any benefit on longevity or heart health is thin, says Dr. Timothy Naimi, a physician and epidemiologist at Boston Medical Center.

On a cold, rainy morning a few weeks ago, eight black inflatable rafts, loaded with migrants, bob in the waters off the northern shore of the Greek island of Lesbos.

One of them isn't moving.

Vassilis Hantzopoulos of the Hellenic Red Cross points to the horizon.

"This boat up there?" he says. "No engine. Failure of the engine. That's it. So they ask for help from the coast guard."

A Norwegian rescue boat with the European Union's border agency, Frontex, heads toward the distressed raft.

The FBI may have found a new way to crack into the locked iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters — a method that doesn't require Apple's help.

This is a major new development in the increasingly heated debate between the tech giant and the government, which has argued that Apple should be compelled to write new special software that would override some security features. That was the only way, investigators previously had said, that they could crack the phone's passcode without jeopardizing its contents.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

One of the two spots attacked in Brussels today was a Metro station. It is near the headquarters of the European Union, and it is also near the restaurant of Andrea Hauptmann, who says she has spent the morning listening to sirens.

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Capping a historic visit to Cuba, President Obama delivered a sweeping speech about American ideals and reconciliation at the Gran Teatro de la Havana.

"I have come here to bury the last remnant of the Cold War in the Americas," Obama said.

The speech was carried live by Cuban state television, giving Obama a chance to speak directly to the Cuban people. Cuban President Raúl Castro sat in the balcony of the theater, where he heard Obama issue a tough rebuke of the Cuban regime's crackdown on dissent.

Kansas Campuses Prepare For Guns In Classrooms

Mar 22, 2016

Next summer, in addition to textbooks, laptops and double-strength coffee, Kansas college students will be able to bring something else to class: guns.

By July 2017, all six state universities plus dozens of community colleges and technical schools must allow students to carry concealed weapons on campus.

The reason for the change was simple: to make schools safer.

Editor's note: In the wake of terrorist attacks around the world, many Muslims feel called upon to publicly defend their faith, a faith many say is not accurately reflected in the stated or assumed motivations behind such attacks. Writer Beenish Ahmed has struggled with this responsibility all her life and shared her thoughts in this essay published by Code Switch as news was unfolding of the attacks in Brussels.

So you walk into the new Korean joint around the corner and discover that (gasp) the head chef is a white guy from Des Moines. What's your gut reaction? Do you want to walk out? Why?

The question of who gets to cook other people's food can be squishy — just like the question of who gets to tell other people's stories. (See: the whole controversy over the casting of the new Nina Simone biopic.)

Deric Mendes

Amy and Steve Bohner of Alchemy Distillery open up about how and why their construction agency is getting into the booze business. They spoke with Jennifer Bell on Food for Thought

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President Trump warned at his rally in Pennsylvania on Wednesday night that if his party loses in November's midterm elections, the "radical Democrat mob" will take away everything he's achieved since his election, while encouraging crime and socialism.

It was an echo of a tweet he sent over the weekend and used again at a rally in Iowa on Tuesday — giving rise to a line that Republicans have been quick to seize upon as they try to sustain a newly-enthused GOP base in the wake of the divisive confirmation battle for now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

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