Elizabeth Kulas

Elizabeth Kulas is a producer on Planet Money. Before that, she produced shows at WNYC, Gimlet and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. In 2016, she was part of the NPR team that reported on the Wells Fargo banking scandal. That reporting won a George Foster Peabody Award, an Edward R. Murrow Award and a Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists. Before falling in love with making audio, she studied Art History and German, with a focus on life in the former East Germany. She graduated from The University of Melbourne in her native Australia, with stints at Barnard College, New York and Berlin's Free University. Right now, she's entirely obsessed with space.

China has been at the center of a months-long debate about tariffs this year. The U.S. has erected trade barriers in two phases so far. Fifty billion dollars of Chinese goods are currently affected. The U.S. trade representative is talking about tariffs on a further $200 billion of imports, which could apply as soon as this week.

It's been almost 20 years since Matt Groening, creator of The Simpsons, has released a new show. He last did it in 1999 with his sci-fi comedy Futurama. But he says, it hasn't been all work since then.

"I love playing," Groening says. "I love inventing worlds."

As it turns out, Groening has been dreaming up a new universe almost all of that time. His new show Disenchantment is an animated fantasy set in the medieval kingdom of Dreamland.

The Trump Administration has been throwing out old trade agreements and putting new tariffs in place. But at the same time, other countries have been re-negotiating their agreements, too, going around the US to hammer out free trade deals. The European Union has been particularly successful, pushing a trade agenda that the US has been resisting for decades. And there's one corner of the economy where things have been particularly explosive: cheese.

Cody Wilson makes gun-making machines. Depending whom you ask, he's either one of the most dangerous people in the world, or a hero of the first amendment.

Cody's never sold a gun. He's never killed anyone. And, to his knowledge, none of the guns he's made have ever killed anyone. So, how did Cody Wilson end up on the frontline of the debate over gun control? He ended up there, not by selling guns, but by creating ways for anyone to make their own gun.

Cody's game-changing tool? 3D printers.