Jessica Eden

Producer, Content Director

jessica.eden@humboldt.edu

Jessica Eden is a producer and photographer who loves public radio and the talented volunteers that make KHSU such a great community station. In addition to her work with KHSU, she has produced content for public media in Alaska, the Pacific Islands, and Australian public broadcasting. Jessica has worked as a field biologist in rural regions of Alaska, the Caribbean and Pacific Islands. Her time on the airwaves on St. Paul Island in the Pribilofs, as the "seabird lady" and "fish guts lady", was the most memorable and enjoyable radio ever.  Jessica received her M.A. in Environment and Community studies, with a focus on Environmental Radio - exploring the confluence of people and place.

Yurok Tribe

Food For Thought continues to highlight traditional Native foods. 

Yurok basketweaver Lena Hurd joins Jennifer Bell to talk about harvesting and preparing acorns for acorn mush. 


Wiyot Tribe

Tending the Wild...

Adam Canter, botanist with the Table Bluff Natural Resouces Department joins Jennifer Bell for another discussion about the cultivation of traditional Wiyot foods and on-going restoration efforts. 


Wiyot Tribe

On this segment of Food For Thought, Jennifer Bell connects with Adam Canter, botanist with the Table Bluff Natural Resouces Department. They discuss historic cultivation of traditional foods and the Wiyot Tribe's current ecological restoration efforts. 


Scholars Yojana Miraya and Brenda Perez discuss their respective areas of research - and the reality of  academia's priviledging of white researchers.


Brenda, Xochitl and Yojana talk with Fany Guzman from Latinos For Cannabis about culture, building community strength, medicine and overcoming stigmas around cannabis use.


Food For Thought

In Wiyot country.  

LeeAnn Moore joins Jennifer Bell to talk about growing up eating traditional Wiyot foods.


This week's Charlando Con La Raza takes on issues at the border. Daniel Castrejon joins the Charlando hosts for an in-depth, honest discussion on immigration and the situation at the California-Mexico border.


NOAA

The next earthquake is likely to happen when you least expect it. Relatively infrequent events are hard to plan for.  Geologist Lori Dengler advises making preparedness a high priority. Make a habit of checking up on your supplies of water, food, batteries and medical supplies.


Meagen Baldy

On this episode of Food For Thought, Jennifer Bell heads inland to join Hupa Tribal members Robert and Meagen Baldy for a discussion about deer hunting traditions - and passing Tribal knowledge on to the next generation. 


As she reflects on this past academic year, Dr. Lisa Rossbacher shares some positive highlights from the Humboldt State University campus.


www.sf.us.emb-japan.go.jp

Following the devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami in northeast Japan, a small boat belonging to Takata High School in Rikuzentakata was swept out to sea. It reached the shores of Crescent City two years later. Del Norte High School students cleaned the boat and returned it to Takata High School. That was the start of a relationship between the two schools - and ultimately the two cities. Crescent City and Rikuzentakata have now formally established a sister city relationship. 


Humboldt State University president Lisa Rossbacher discusses next year's budget.

With so many unknowns around state legislator and governor decision making, one thing we can applaud is the decision to maintain tuition rates at current levels . There will be no tuition increase for this coming academic year.


This week's Charlando Con La Raza features interviews with an HSU journalism student and Humboldt Baykeeper's Latino Outreach coordinator. Through their distinct disciplines, Jose Herrera and Jasmin Segura talk about passion for community work.


On this week's Food For Thought, Bruce Kaye joins Jennifer Bell to talk about his Hopi and Navajo roots and traditional foods from the region.


Xochitl, Brenda and Yojana discuss issues of justice and race locally and around the country.

How do we create positive change in our institutions and on the streets?

In a supremely difficult and divisive political landscape, how do we ensure justice and safety in our communities?

This week's Charlando Con La Raza takes on these challenging questions.


This installment of Charlando highlights the work of Cesar Chavez and discussion about the experience of  "culture" in the United States. Yojana and Brenda talk about expectations and surprises in their experiences living and studying here in the U.S.


On this episode of Food For Thought, Jennifer Bell continues her discussion with Kate Brown from Cultured Life Food.

They discuss making gomasio using locally sourced salt and quinoa flour sourced from locally grown grain.


NOAA

How will we know a tsunami may be coming?

Other than feeling the ground shake, we rely on tsunami warning centers to alert us about potential risk.  Dr. Lori Dengler explains the process for accessing and communicating a tsunami hazard.


When an earthquake happens, responding appropriately and efficiently will save lives. 


Abby Wutzler, from Wellington New
Zealand, was vacationing in Samoa
on September 29, 2009 when she
noticed the ocean was withdrawing.
She had also been taught about the
natural warning signs of a tsunami
in school and ran up and down the
beach yelling that a tsunami was
coming.  Many tourists credit Abby’s warning with
saving their lives.


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