Regional Interests

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Struggling to Return Home After the Fire

17 hours ago

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It's hard to make a show about high school football in 2018, even seven-plus years after the end of Friday Night Lights. FNL was so revered, so satisfying, so good, that a show that asks us to care about 17-year-old running backs faces a steep climb.

Doctors have gradually come to realize that people who survive a serious brush with death in the intensive care unit are likely to develop potentially serious problems with their memory and thinking processes.

This dementia, a side effect of intensive medical care, can be permanent. And it affects as many as half of all people who are rushed to the ICU after a medical emergency. Considering that 5.7 million Americans end up in intensive care every year, this is a major problem that until recently, has been poorly appreciated by medical caregivers.

In the basement of a suburban Philadelphia home, half a dozen high school freshman boys recently met to munch on chips and pretzels — and to talk about sexual assault in the wake of the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings.

A Jewish organization called Moving Traditions brought them together as part of its programs to encourage teenagers to talk about this and other difficult issues.

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This morning, we are remembering a man who broke a barrier in the NFL. George Taliaferro died Monday at the age of 91.

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Not so long ago — the administration of President George W. Bush — $1 million could get you elected to Congress. Now, four weeks from Election Day, Democrats say 60 of their candidates raised that much or more, just in the last three months.

Fueled by an energetic base of small donors, Democrats are going into the final stretch of the election with a substantial financial advantage, erasing Republicans' typical fundraising edge.

The end of the fight over Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination sets up a new battleground over abortion rights, and activists on both sides of the issue are gearing up for what's likely to be a series of contentious battles from the high court to state legislatures.

A Missouri judge ruled on Tuesday that state election officials can no longer tell voters they must show a photo ID in order to cast a ballot. The ruling blocks part of Missouri's voter identification law.

Cole County's Judge Richard Callahan said the state cannot advertise that a photo identification is required to cast a ballot. "No compelling state interest is served by misleading local election authorities and voters into believing a photo ID card is a requirement for voting," he wrote in his ruling.

Updated at 11:08 p.m. ET

The eye of Hurricane Michael is weakening as it churns across south-central Georgia. Now a Category 1 storm with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph, it made landfall around midday Wednesday in the Florida Panhandle near Panama City at Category 4 strength, with winds of 155 mph.

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Political junkies hoping to hear something new from the top two candidates for Oregon governor didn’t find much Tuesday night, as Democratic Gov. Kate Brown and Republican Rep. Knute Buehler met for their third and final debate.

In a campus-wide email sent Tuesday morning, Clark College President Bob Knight announced a series of campus meetings to address challenges around recruiting and retaining employees of color.

The decision is in response to reporting this week from OPB on the college’s struggles around diversity and inclusion.

A two-year legal fight over Portland Public Schools’ handling of public records has ended with a financial hit to Oregon’s largest school district.

The legal debate dates back to November 2016 and involved two people familiar with requesting and analyzing education documents: Beth Slovic, who has been an education reporter for Willamette Week, the Portland Tribune and The Oregonian/Oregonlive; and parent-activist Kim Sordyl who sits on the state Board of Education as a non-voting representative of the Oregon secretary of state.

For nearly 20 years Republican Rep. Greg Walden has locked up re-election in Oregon’s 2nd Congressional District. This time, however, Democrat Jamie McLeod-Skinner is betting on voters with an independent streak. 

Those voters include Anthony Bowman of Pendleton.

“I don’t necessarily vote on the right side or the left side. I just read about all the candidates, all the issues and choose,” he said.

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More Bad News for PG&E

Oct 9, 2018

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