Natalya Estrada

Charmaine Lawson: 'I'm not strong. I'm broken.'

As the noon bell rang at Humboldt State University, a crowd of nearly 100 people began to form near the UC Quad. They stood in silence as Charmaine Lawson, mother of David Josiah Lawson, who was murdered almost two years ago, made her way to the front.

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Details are still trickling in from today's attacks in Brussels that have killed at least two-dozen people. We're keeping you updated on the latest here.

While the tragedy in Brussels is the focus of headlines around the world, we're reminded that there have been a number of other attacks recently that have seen less attention, some in places where access is difficult and reporting resources are limited.

Rob Ford, the former Toronto mayor whose drug-addled fall from grace made international news, has died.

Ford had been fighting cancer since 2014. In a statement, his family said he died earlier today at age 46.

"A dedicated man of the people, Councillor Ford spent his life serving the citizens of Toronto," the family said in a statement.

Editor's Note: In a conflict that dates back generations, Israelis and Palestinians rarely change their positions or their minds. NPR's Emily Harris, who has reported from Jerusalem since 2013, explores what prompts a relative few to adopt a new perspective. This is one of several stories.

Bassam Aramin was not born hating Israel, but he learned young.

On any given weekend, the Washington, D.C., public library system offers nearly a dozen classes. You can try Matt McEntee's class, where he'll teach you how to fix anything from a clock to a broken heart. Maybe you're interested in creating a photo book, or you'd like to get better at Microsoft Word?

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After terrorist attacks in Brussels on Tuesday morning that killed more than 30 people and wounded more than 200, American politicians took to social media and TV news programs to respond to the violence.

Several pointed to the attacks as a reason to focus America's fight against Islamic extremism.

We're compiling responses from elected officials and presidential candidates here:

You've probably heard that a little booze a day is good for you. I've even said it at parties. "Look at the French," I've said gleefully over my own cup. "Wine all the time and they still live to be not a day younger than 82."

I'm sorry to say we're probably wrong. The evidence that alcohol has any benefit on longevity or heart health is thin, says Dr. Timothy Naimi, a physician and epidemiologist at Boston Medical Center.

On a cold, rainy morning a few weeks ago, eight black inflatable rafts, loaded with migrants, bob in the waters off the northern shore of the Greek island of Lesbos.

One of them isn't moving.

Vassilis Hantzopoulos of the Hellenic Red Cross points to the horizon.

"This boat up there?" he says. "No engine. Failure of the engine. That's it. So they ask for help from the coast guard."

A Norwegian rescue boat with the European Union's border agency, Frontex, heads toward the distressed raft.

The FBI may have found a new way to crack into the locked iPhone of one of the San Bernardino shooters — a method that doesn't require Apple's help.

This is a major new development in the increasingly heated debate between the tech giant and the government, which has argued that Apple should be compelled to write new special software that would override some security features. That was the only way, investigators previously had said, that they could crack the phone's passcode without jeopardizing its contents.

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New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, in her first speech to her nation's Parliament after last week's terrorist attacks on two mosques in Christchurch, said the gunman should be denied the publicity he was seeking.

"That's why you will never hear me mention his name," said Ardern. "He is a terrorist, he is a criminal, he is an extremist. But he will, when I speak, be nameless."

The alleged shooter had written a 74-page screed promoting his white supremacist views and had livestreamed his attack on the Al Noor mosque in Christchurch.

In the days following Friday's mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, the prime minister has called for gun law reforms, and the suspected shooter awaits trial.

An outpouring of friends and family has turned out to mourn the 50 people gunned down during prayers.

Meanwhile, more details are emerging about the accused attacker, Brenton Tarrant.

The 28-year-old, an Australian citizen who lives in New Zealand, has been charged with one count of murder so far but could face more charges. New Zealand's police force says it believes he acted alone.

This series was funded in part thanks to a grant from the Solutions Journalism Network.

The Oregon Child Welfare system is in crisis — and has been for years.

Last year, while state lawmakers were considering a landmark bill to open up previously confidential police misconduct records to the public, the City of Fremont quietly destroyed a large archive of papers, cassettes, and computer files documenting over four decades of internal affairs investigations and citizen complaints. It is not known if the destroyed records could have covered officer-involved shootings.

‘Night Witches’ by Garth Ennis and Russ Braun.

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