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Portland Shootings Increase Despite Stay At Home Order

1 hour ago

The Portland Police Bureau reported Thursday that shootings in the city have increased during the first week of April, despite the COVID-19 restrictions on gatherings and movement.

The bureau’s gun violence reduction team says Portland averages one shooting a day, but since March 31 — a span of nine days — there were 17 shootings.

Speaking at a press availability on April 3, PPB Chief Jami Resch said the bureau also has seen an increase in domestic violence calls and speeding citations.

After weeks of searching, Clark County has found 116 hotel rooms for unhoused people who come into contact with the novel coronavirus.

The rooms will be used to isolate people experiencing homelessness who have tested positive for COVID-19, as well as to quarantine others who may have been exposed.

The European Union's finance ministers have reached a deal on a 540 billion-euro rescue plan (about $590 billion) to support the continent's coronavirus-stricken economies.

The Eurogroup, which consists of the 19 finance ministers representing the EU's eurozone countries, approved the rescue package on Thursday after the Netherlands backtracked on its demand for economic reform and oversight.

Dr. Mitchell Katz, head of New York City’s public hospitals, updates Marisa and Scott on the coronavirus outbreak in New York City, the health system’s greatest need, and what is necessary to restart the economy. He also discusses how his siblings’ developmental disabilities influenced his career and his time spent as the leading health official in San Francisco and Los Angeles.

On this broadcast of The National Conversation, we'll answer your questions on the latest unemployment numbers, efforts to flatten the curve and the number of COVID-19 cases.

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From shows taped in a field to episodes filmed in a hallway, TV's late-night talk show hosts have found a wide variety of ways to keep broadcasting while in social isolation. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has the scoop on who's succeeding and who is stumbling in the effort to keep America laughing in late-night.

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From shows taped in a field to episodes filmed in a hallway, TV's late-night talk show hosts have found a wide variety of ways to keep broadcasting while in social isolation. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has the scoop on who's succeeding and who is stumbling in the effort to keep America laughing in late-night.

NPR economics and science correspondents answer questions about the staggering unemployment numbers announced Thursday, and convey the latest updates from Thursday's White House briefing.

Dr. Ashish Jha, director of the Global Health Institute at Harvard University, answers listener questions about the specifics of "flattening the curve" of coronavirus infection.

Dr. Wayne Riley, president of SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, and an NPR science correspondent answer questions about the racial disparity in how the coronavirus is impacting patients.

Dr. Wayne Riley, president of SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, and an NPR science correspondent answer more questions about the racial disparity in how the coronavirus is impacting patients.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Rev. Radu Titonea, a hospital chaplain in Queens, N.Y., about ministry and the celebration of holy days during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Emma Pierce was driving home from the airport when she got the call from her tattoo shop.

Since she’d been on vacation in Japan for three weeks, the shop owner explained, and since this new thing called the coronavirus seemed pretty dangerous, some coworkers had expressed concern about her returning to work after traveling abroad.

At midnight one day last month, I got a call from a friend whose husband is in a memory care facility. Coronavirus was newly recognized across California, and in order to control infections, assisted living and nursing homes had begun to limit visitors.

She couldn’t sleep. Her husband had called her dozens of times that day. He didn’t remember that he’d already called; he wanted to go outside and nobody was there to take him. He was alone.

“It is beyond heartbreaking,” she said, her voice cracking, again and again. “What are we supposed to do?”

The Department of Health and Human Services is stepping back from a plan to end support on Friday for community-based coronavirus testing sites around the country.

Instead the agency says local authorities can choose whether they want to transition to running the programs themselves or continue with federal oversight and help.

La orden de quedarse en casa ha hecho que muchos se sientan frustrados de no poder salir. Uno solo puede caminar y moverse dentro de su casa tantas veces antes de sentirse encerrado.

Muchos expertos coinciden en que salir y estar en la naturaleza puede ser crucial tanto para nuestra salud física como mental. Y para algunos, el hogar no es un lugar seguro y el poder salir de ese entorno no solo es importante, es esencial.

A U.S. Border Patrol agent wouldn’t let Jackeline Reyes explain why she and her 15-year-old daughter needed asylum, pointing to the coronavirus. That confrontation in Texas came just days after the Trump administration quietly shut down the nation’s asylum system for the first time in decades in the name of public health.

“The agent told us about the virus and that we couldn’t go further, but she didn’t let us speak or anything,” said Reyes, 35, who was shuttled to a crossing on March 24 in Reynosa, Mexico, a violent border city.

Surf Is Definitely Not Up in Santa Cruz

4 hours ago

Yes, surfing in Santa Cruz could now get you sent to jail.

Responding to “an unusually high volume of use,” the county shut down all public parks and beaches to recreational activities ranging from horseback riding to surfing.

Even though Santa Cruz is practically synonymous with surfing, surviving the coronavirus pandemic is worth skipping the waves for a few weeks, don’t you think?

The number of patients being treated at overflow hospitals in New York City has more than doubled in the last two days, the Department of Defense says.

On Thursday, military doctors and nurses were treating 189 patients at the overflow hospital at the Javits Convention Center in Manhattan, including 15 patients who are being treated in an intensive care unit inside the facility. The Navy hospital ship, the U.S.N.S. Comfort, currently has 53 patients, including 10 who are critically ill with COVID-19.

On Tuesday, the two facilities had fewer than 100 patients combined.

Property taxes are still due on April 10 in most California counties — despite the fact that county offices are closed.

Nearly all counties across the state have agreed to waive penalties for late payments though if you can demonstrate you’ve been impacted by the COVID-19 emergency and can’t pay right now. Those exceptions will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

There are some exceptions to the due date — San Mateo and San Francisco counties both extended their deadlines to May 4. But those who are able to pay are encouraged to pay now.

Phyllis Lyon, a pioneer in the struggle for lesbian and gay rights, died Thursday morning in San Francisco of natural causes at the age of 95.

She was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1924 but spent her formative years in Sacramento before graduating from UC Berkeley. In 1955, Lyon and her late wife Del Martin, along with three other lesbian couples, co-founded the Daughters of Bilitis, the nation’s first organization devoted to promoting the rights of lesbians. It was just part of Lyon’s lifelong advocacy for LGBT people.

Amid growing concerns about military readiness, a sailor from the coronavirus-sidelined aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt became the first crew member to be hospitalized in intensive care in Guam Thursday. He is one of more than 400 of the ship's sailors who have tested positive for COVID-19.

A worker at a Whole Foods Market location on Market Street in San Francisco has been diagnosed with COVID-19, a company spokesperson confirmed to KQED on Thursday.

The diagnosis marks at least the second confirmed case of a Whole Foods employee in San Francisco coming down with the virus. A worker at the grocery chain’s Stanyan Street location previously tested positive in March. Both stores remain open.

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With France, like much of the world, in lockdown because of the coronavirus, the country's Christians will not be able to gather in churches to celebrate Easter this year.

But the archbishop of Paris says he wants to send a strong signal of hope to the faithful by holding a small Good Friday ceremony amid the rubble inside Notre Dame, and beaming it out to the world.

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Over the last three weeks, with businesses across the U.S. closing up in the fight against the coronavirus, nearly 17 million people have filed for unemployment.

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