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In the first part of Political Breakdown’s inauguration preview, Marisa and Scott discuss the latest safety precautions at the U.S. and California State Capitol buildings, the threat of extremist groups during Joe Biden’s first term and how domestic extremism could affect Republican Party politics, with KQED’s Katie Orr, USA Today national correspondent Will Carless and The Bulwark writer-at-large Tim Miller.

A man holding a rifle approached a mass car caravan in Alameda that was honoring “the radical legacy” of Martin Luther King Jr. on Monday afternoon.

The caravan shut down its protest earlier than intended at the home of Alameda District Attorney Nancy O’Malley when organizers warned participants that the man was seen standing with a rifle nearby.

“I was scared, I was fearful for my life,” 68-year-old protester Melody Davis told KQED. She said the man shouted at protesters to leave.

The Muslim Educational Trust and a collection of faith community members came together Monday to offer a chance for Clackamas County Commissioner Mark Shull to apologize for offensive and racist remarks he made on Facebook in recent years.

Republican Sen. Josh Hawley of Missouri has a new reason to raise a clenched fist in the air: After much controversy, his book The Tyranny of Big Tech will be published.

Washington-based Regnery Publishing, which aims to spread the message of "prominent and lasting voices in American conservatism," announced on Monday it will publish the title in May.

Updated at 9:09 p.m ET

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville is firing its head football coach, two assistant coaches and seven other team staffers after an outside investigation found "serious violations of NCAA rules."

Ahead of Wednesday’s Inauguration Day, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris formally resigned her Senate seat to California Gov. Newsom.

In a video address, the self-proclaimed “kid from Oakland” recalled being a Senate intern as sophomore at Howard University in 1984, as well as highlights from her four-year career in the chamber, including fighting climate change and her advocacy in making lynching a federal crime.

Clara Jean Ester was a college student at Memphis State College in Tennessee when she bore witness to a series of pivotal moments in civil rights history.

As a junior, Ester joined the Memphis Sanitation Strike in 1968, alongside African American sanitation workers who were calling to demand better working conditions and higher wages.

She was there at around that same time that Dr. Martin Luther King gave his final speech. She was also there the next day when Dr. King was assassinated.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

On January 6, thousands of rioters pushed past police barriers, defied police orders to retreat and illegally broke into the U.S. Capitol building. Police officers were injured trying to control the crowd. One was killed. Now we are learning that some of the rioters were sworn officers themselves. I'm joined now by Kimberly Kindy. She's an investigative reporter for The Washington Post.

Hey there.

KIMBERLY KINDY: Hey, thanks for having me.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers try to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings, sidewalks for those living outside. Due to the pandemic, this year's street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the numbers appear to be on the rise. NPR's Pam Fessler reports.

Every January, in the middle of the night, thousands of volunteers and outreach workers spread out across the country to count the nation's homeless population. They search highway underpasses, wooded areas, abandoned buildings and sidewalks to locate those who are living outside.

But this year, because of the pandemic, the annual street count has been canceled or modified in hundreds of communities, even as the nation's unsheltered population appears to be growing.

What do Walt Disney, Whitney Houston, Dolley Madison and Frederick Douglass have in common? They're part of an extensive list of 244 people that President Trump says he wants to honor as statues in the proposed "National Garden of American Heroes."

With just two days left before he leaves office, though, the venture is highly unlikely to ever be realized by him or President-elect Joe Biden's administration.

Guatemala security forces are attempting to block thousands of Honduran migrants from heading north towards Mexico and the U.S. border.

On Sunday, police and soldiers in riot gear confronted a caravan of migrants from Honduras on a highway near Chiquimula in southeastern Guatemala. After a tense standoff, in which police fired tear gas and attempted to beat back the migrants with batons, the surging crowd broke through a phalanx of soldiers.

One day ahead of the federal holiday honoring the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., Georgia Sen.-elect the Rev. Raphael Warnock took to the pulpit of the civil rights icon’s spiritual home to preach a message of equity, integrity, possibility and inclusivity.

Warnock, who served as the senior pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta for more than a decade before his election to the Senate, spoke at length about “God’s vision of the land” in a livestreamed sermon that paid tribute to King’s work and the ways in which it continues today.

Just over a year after the world's first coronavirus cases were identified in China, the country's economy has bounced back from the ravages of the pandemic.

China's economy grew by 2.3% last year, according to data published Monday by the country's National Bureau of Statistics. The steady economic recovery was largely expected, and puts China on a track that other countries haven't achieved.

A California man was arrested Saturday and accused hiding in a restricted area of Chicago's O'Hare International Airport for three months. The man told police that COVID-19 had rendered him too scared to travel home to California, so he hid in the airport, surviving on food provided by strangers, the Associated Press reported.

Officials in Santa Clara County, the most populous county in the Bay Area, say they can’t expand access to the COVID-19 vaccine yet because there’s not enough supply.

“The biggest constraints we are facing right now is the availability of vaccines,” said Dr. Jennifer Tong, associate chief medical officer for Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. “We really need a stable supply to be able to predict our capacity and expand our capacity in the future.”

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny called on his supporters to protest after he was arrested at a Moscow airport Sunday.

"Don't be afraid. Take to the streets. Don't do it for me, do it for yourselves and your future," Navalny said in a video posted to YouTube, the social media platform that has brought his anti-Kremlin message to the farthest corners of Russia. Navalny's supporters say they will organize nationwide protests on Jan. 23.

Updated at 6:37 p.m. ET

The Trump-appointed director of the U.S. Census Bureau is stepping down close to a week after whistleblower complaints about his role in attempting to rush out an incomplete data report about noncitizens became public.

Contra Costa County health officials say demand for the vaccine has skyrocketed since the state expanded eligibility to people 65 and over on Wednesday, with 1,000 requests coming into the county website each hour.

Dr. Ori Tzvieli, deputy health officer and COVID-19 operations chief for the county, said on Friday Contra Costa will prioritize people 75 and older and those living in areas where the coronavirus is more prevalent.

A year ago the official Twitter account of the Federal Bureau of Investigation tweeted, “Today, the FBI honors the life and work of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.” It was accompanied by a photo of the FBI Academy’s reflecting pool, where a quote from King is etched in stone: “The time is always right to do what is right.”

When Nadia Owusu was 7 years old and living in Rome with her father, stepmother and younger sister, two events occurred on the same day that upended her world.

The first was a disaster she didn't experience personally, but heard about on the radio: a catastrophic earthquake in Armenia, where her mother's family had lived before they sought refuge in America. The second was the sudden appearance of her mother, standing nervously at the front door, gripping a pair of red balloons in her hands.

Sarah Fuller is no stranger to making history. The Vanderbilt University senior shattered glass ceilings this winter as the first woman to play and score in a Power Five college football game. And she's now slated to take part in Wednesday's inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

Osvaldo Golijov is a MacArthur "genius" composer who's written for Yo-Yo Ma, Kronos Quartet and soprano Dawn Upshaw. But in 2012, he was accused of plagiarism, and he disappeared from the scene. Only now, nearly a decade later, is Golijov reemerging — with a work that could not have a more timely subject: it's a meditation on grieving and loss.

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