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A state Senate committee in Florida is recommending the full Senate uphold the governor's suspension of former Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel. Gov. Ron DeSantis suspended Israel shortly after taking office in January, fulfilling a promise made during the election campaign.

The parents of Owen Klinger, the University of Portland student missing since October 6, believe the body police found in the Willamette River Sunday is their son, according to a family spokesperson.

Susan Lennertz, who has helped spearhead the searches for Klinger, said the police had called the family, telling them details about the body that they linked to their son.

On Monday afternoon, she sent out the following statement, attributed to Owen’s parents, Dustin and Mary Klinger:

The exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power 1963–1983 premiered at the Tate Modern in London in 2017, has traveled to the Broad Musuem in Los Angeles, and, starting Nov. 9, will call San Francisco home through March 2020.

As cars become smarter and safer, some members of Congress want to require them to be built to prevent drunk driving.

Sens. Tom Udall, D-N.M., and Rick Scott, R-Fla., introduced legislation last week that would make it mandatory for all new cars and trucks to come loaded with passive, virtually unnoticeable, alcohol detection systems by 2024.

BOSTON — Four parents from California have pleaded guilty in the college admissions bribery scandal, and a Texas man accused of helping to orchestrate the scheme has also agreed to a plea deal.

Parent Douglas Hodge of Laguna Beach entered his guilty plea in Boston’s federal court Monday after previously pleading not guilty in April. Also reversing their pleas on Monday were parents Michelle Janavs of Newport Coast, and Manuel and Elizabeth Henriquez of Atherton. Each faces charges of fraud and money laundering.

Newly Renovated Oregon Convention Center Unveiled

14 hours ago

The Oregon Convention Center has emerged from a 14-month renovation looking, contractors hope, a little more like Oregon.

The carpets, black and grey with green splotches, are meant to resemble lichen. Staff say the new ballroom ceiling takes its inspiration from the forest. And the wooden slats on the ceiling create a topographical map of the Cascade mountain range.

The design changes, unveiled to community members Monday afternoon,  are part of a $40 million renovation that Convention Center leaders hope will boost Portland’s image as a top-notch meeting destination.

If there's one thing you do want to catch from a trip to your doctor, it's her optimism.

A new study, published Monday in the journal Nature Human Behavior, finds that patients can pick up on subtle facial cues from doctors that reveal the doctor's belief in how effective a treatment will be. And that can have a real impact on the patient's treatment outcome.

The Justice Department is proposing to begin collecting DNA samples from hundreds of thousands of immigrants crossing the border, creating an enormous database of asylum-seekers and other migrants that federal officials say will be used to help authorities fight crime.

President Trump is chastising Republicans for not sufficiently having his back as he tries to weather an impeachment inquiry from Democrats.

"Republicans have to get tougher and fight," Trump said during a Cabinet meeting on Monday. "We have some that are great fighters, but they have to get tougher and fight because the Democrats are trying to hurt the Republican Party for the election."

Industry Files Lawsuit To Stop Washington's Flavored Vape Ban

14 hours ago

One of the vaping industry’s trade associations filed a lawsuit in Washington state Monday to try and block a new flavored vape ban.

Updated at 9:15 p.m. ET

Immigration hard-liners inside and outside the White House are fighting to keep Ken Cuccinelli and Mark Morgan in the running for the top job at the Department of Homeland Security after their candidacies hit a snag.

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Technology that would prevent you from driving if you have had too much to drink could become mandatory in all new cars. That is if legislation now in Congress becomes law. NPR's Vanessa Romo reports on two bills to require automakers to build new cars and trucks with alcohol detection systems.

VANESSA ROMO, BYLINE: Before Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico was Senator Tom Udall, he was that state's attorney general. And back then - we're talking the 1990s...

Facebook announced new efforts Monday to curb the spread of false information on its platform ahead of the 2020 presidential election.

But, in an acknowledgement of the struggle the social network faces to stay ahead of groups intent on manipulating its users, Facebook said it had taken down another set of disinformation networks, this time tied to Iran and Russia. That adds to the more than 50 such networks the company said it has already removed in the past year.

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This is what Lebanon sounds like tonight.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Chanting in foreign language).

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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President Trump is defending his decision to withdraw most troops from Syria, leaving behind the Kurds who fought alongside the U.S. against ISIS.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Technology that would prevent you from driving if you have had too much to drink could become mandatory in all new cars. That is if legislation now in Congress becomes law. NPR's Vanessa Romo reports on two bills to require automakers to build new cars and trucks with alcohol detection systems.

VANESSA ROMO, BYLINE: Before Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico was Senator Tom Udall, he was that state's attorney general. And back then - we're talking the 1990s...

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Technology that would prevent you from driving if you have had too much to drink could become mandatory in all new cars. That is if legislation now in Congress becomes law. NPR's Vanessa Romo reports on two bills to require automakers to build new cars and trucks with alcohol detection systems.

VANESSA ROMO, BYLINE: Before Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico was Senator Tom Udall, he was that state's attorney general. And back then - we're talking the 1990s...

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Canadians are voting today on whether to keep Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party in power. The race is tight after revelations of scandals involving Trudeau. David McGuffin reports from Ottawa.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Technology that would prevent you from driving if you have had too much to drink could become mandatory in all new cars. That is if legislation now in Congress becomes law. NPR's Vanessa Romo reports on two bills to require automakers to build new cars and trucks with alcohol detection systems.

VANESSA ROMO, BYLINE: Before Senator Tom Udall of New Mexico was Senator Tom Udall, he was that state's attorney general. And back then - we're talking the 1990s...

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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On a cold, sunny October day on the outskirts of Copenhagen, Denmark, a group of men dressed in black gathers outside Brondby Stadium to shoot off a couple of rockets, raise their fists and shout about how the home team will soon beat — and beat up — the visiting archnemesis, FC Copenhagen.

Police are out in force, riot helmets at the ready. Brondby-Copenhagen matches have a history of leading to vandalism, arrests and general mayhem.

Protests continue in Chile after a weekend of violence and destruction over a recent transit hike. The unrest continued after President Sebastián Piñera suspended the 4 percent fare increase.

The protests in the capital city of Santiago come amid growing discontent over rising the cost of living and lack of salary increases. The weekend's riots saw protesters shut down the Metro de Santiago and burn down a high rise. Officials have reported at least eight deaths as a result of the protests.

The Justice Department is proposing to begin collecting DNA samples from hundreds of thousands of immigrants crossing the border, creating an enormous database of asylum-seekers and other migrants that federal officials say will be used to help authorities fight crime.

In one corner of Nordstrom's new flagship store in New York City, interlocking Burberry logos covered every surface. Dramatic string music played. And beyond the merchandise, a small cafe doused in bright pink seemed to be just waiting for someone to pose for a photo.

"No professional photographs," a spokesperson guiding members of the press through the store said. "But social photos are OK."

Time to get used to power shutoffs.

PG&E CEO and President Bill Johnson said Friday it could take up to 10 years to improve the utility’s system enough to not have to rely on power shutoffs during high fire danger.

At the same emergency meeting of the California Public Utilities Commission, the vice president of PG&E’s community wildfire safety program said that updating the utility’s power lines could take 10 to 14 years and improving vegetation management could take 8 years.

Oregon has its first conviction under the state’s overhauled hate crime law.

Multnomah County District Attorney Rod Underhill announced Monday that Don Kirchhoff pleaded guilty Oct. 18 to a first-degree bias crime. Court documents show that Kirchoff admitted starting a fight and using hate speech toward two men in downtown Portland on Sept. 1.

The altercation started with Kirchoff using homophobic and racist language, and then assaulting one of the men physically.

Kirchhoff was sentenced to 36 months of probation and 15 days in jail, with credit for time served.

Updated 6:15 p.m. Monday

With another round of windy, bone-dry weather expected to descend on Northern and Central California later this week, PG&E is alerting customers that it may again shut off power to communities from parts of the Bay Area to the Sierra foothills to reduce the danger of its electrical lines touching off wildfires.

With another round of windy, bone-dry weather expected to descend on Northern and Central California later this week, PG&E is alerting customers that it may again shut off power to communities from the North Bay to the Sierra foothills to reduce the danger of its electrical lines touching off wildfires.

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