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Can an artist’s original intentions withstand the test of time and modern sentiment?

A mural at George Washington High School in San Francisco — that some have described as degrading; others have called it historic — will be obscured from public view. The question is how?

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Now to Wisconsin, where state lawmakers are rethinking that state's drunk driving laws - in particular, the part that goes easy on the first offense. Here's Corrinne Hess of Wisconsin Public Radio.

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Just days ago, the Trump administration was set to drop bombs on Iran. Now it's back to sanctions.

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For millions of Americans, this week's debates will be their introduction to many of the almost two dozen Democrats running for president, vying for the chance to try to unseat President Trump next year.

Twenty of the candidates will debate over two nights — Wednesday and Thursday — in Miami on NBC, MSNBC and Telemundo. Some lesser-known candidates will be hoping for a boost, and those who are better-known have pressure on them to perform.

Troll Watch: Robocalls

Jun 23, 2019

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Let's go now to Sao Paolo, Brazil, where a huge crowd has gathered for the annual gay pride parade. Here is the scene from earlier this afternoon.

(CHEERING)

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For the second time since breaking his hip a month ago, former President Jimmy Carter taught Sunday school at Maranatha Baptist Church in his hometown of Plains, Ga. this weekend.

Addressing an audience of approximately 500, the 94 year old used his scripture lesson to discuss a topic he is intimately familiar with: Iran.

Researchers at Scotland's University of St Andrews have coaxed a seal to "sing" the first notes of the Star Wars theme song and "Twinkle Twinkle, Little Star".

In a video released by the university, a gray seal named Zola hears a computer play the first seven notes of the Star Wars theme, and then barks the tune back, stretching the last two notes.

An attempted coup in Ethiopia has left four officials dead, including the country's military chief, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed's office announced on Sunday.

Abiy, the first member of Ethiopia's Oromo ethnic group to lead the country, took to state television wearing military fatigues. He urged for calm as he addressed the nation about the killings.

The chief of Ethiopia's armed forces, Gen. Seare Mekonnen, was fatally shot at his home on Saturday night by his bodyguard in the capital of Addis Ababa, he said. A retired general who was visiting Seare was also killed.

Presidential challengers hoping to glide to victory through California’s newly relevant primary, a heads-up: Your electoral fate may hinge on convincing enough left-leaning millennials to send postcards over the holiday season.

Last December, Brighid FitzGibbon’s son, Evan, entered a catatonic state. Acute psychosis had hit suddenly a few weeks earlier, toward the end of fall semester of his sophomore year at Bard College in upstate New York. Gripped by terrifying delusions, his body began to shut down.

FitzGibbon and her husband, Taylor, rushed their 20-year-old son to a hospital in Sonoma County, where they live. An acquaintance told them about a promising program for young people experiencing early psychosis. But the family quickly discovered a problem: the program didn’t exist in their county.

Dave Bartholomew, photographed on January 12, 2013 in New Orleans.
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Dave Bartholo

It's midnight in Sommaroy, but the sun is still shining on this Norwegian island. The clock strikes 12, but the island's residents are playing, working, fishing and socializing. Nighttime commands sleep, but Sommaroy doesn't want to listen.

If the 350 residents of Sommaroy get their way, the clocks will stop ticking and the alarms will cease their noise. A campaign to do away with timekeeping on the island has gained momentum as Norway's parliament considers the island's petition.

Istanbul has elected a new mayor in a rerun that is widely being seen as a referendum on President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his grip on Turkey after the first mayoral elections were annulled.

Opposition candidate Ekrem Imamoglu, of the Republican People's Party (CHP), won the race by a slim margin in March. It was the first time Erdogan's Justice and Development Party (AKP) lost control of the city in 25 years.

But Imamoglu spent just 18 days in office.

The U.S. Census Bureau is using new high-tech tools to help get an accurate population count next year as its faces challenges tallying people of color who live in remote places and can be wary of the federal government.

The agency is using aerial images of rural communities and hard-to-reach areas to verify addresses and determine where to send workers to ensure everyone is counted, Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham said.

Across the country, surgeons are learning to use more than just scalpels and forceps. In the past decade, a growing number of medical institutions have invested in the da Vinci robot, the most common device used to perform robot-assisted, or robotic, surgery.

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