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Electric assisted bicycles, or e-bikes, are becoming more and more popular across the United States. Throughout the country's national parks, that could be a good and a bad thing.

It can be tough to distinguish an e-bike from a regular road or mountain bike by sight, but once you start pedaling, you sure feel the difference.

Scientists have created a new way to edit DNA that appears to make it even easier to precisely and safely re-write genes.

The new technique, called prime editing, is designed to overcome some of the limitations of CRISPR. That technique, often described as a kind of molecular scissors for genes, has been revolutionizing scientific research by letting scientists alter DNA.

Are Blackouts The Future For California?

16 hours ago

After millions of Californians endured a power shutdown earlier this month, state officials are demanding that utilities find ways to reduce the impact of outages. Blackouts are almost certain to happen again to prevent devastating wildfires. In fact, power company Pacific Gas & Electric now says customers can expect outages for at least a decade as it upgrades its systems.

Boys Don't Cry opened in theaters Oct. 22, 1999, first on 25 screens before spreading to hundreds. It became a runaway hit that drew rave reviews for its empathetic portrayal of a young person on a quest for love and acceptance — based on the true story of murdered Nebraskan Brandon Teena — at a time when transgender characters were just not represented on screen.

When Riki Wilchins began transitioning in the late 1970s, she says there was very little trans visibility, even in large cities.

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What Breaking Up Big Tech Might Look Like

16 hours ago

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And now a closer look at one of the people President Trump says is trying to destroy the country.

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Local officials and emergency response personnel in Dallas are gauging the extent of damage inflicted by a powerful tornado that touched down in the city on Sunday night. While extensive structural damage was apparent by Monday morning, no fatalities or injuries have been reported.

In the 1960s, Janis Joplin was an icon of the counterculture, a female rock star at a time when rock was an all-boys’ club.

“At that point in time there weren’t too many women taking center stage,” biographer Holly George-Warren says. “Janis created this incredible image that went along with her amazing vocal ability. … [She] was very, very different than most of the women that came before.”

More Stories For You

Indian Island off the coast of Northern California was the site of a massacre, a place that was contaminated by a shipyard and flush with invasive species.

It’s also the spiritual and physical center of the universe for the small Wiyot Tribe, and it will belong to them almost entirely Monday after a city deeds all the land it owns on the island to the tribe.

“It’s a really good example of resilience because Wiyot people never gave up the dream,” tribal administrator Michelle Vassel said. “It’s a really good story about healing and about coming together of community.”

After nearly a month of fraught negotiations, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has abandoned his attempt to form a new government. On Monday, the longtime leader, who heads the conservative Likud party, acknowledged his failure to cobble together a coalition from last month's muddled election results, and he returned the mandate to President Reuven Rivlin.

Have you ever felt the urge to drop everything and move, because maybe your hometown leaves you feeling like you can't totally be yourself in some way?

Polls suggest Democratic Sen. Kamala Harris is no longer the front-runner in her home state. But year-to-date, she remains the preferred candidate by that other major metric of campaign success: money.

Yet even in the race for cash, her share of itemized California contributions has plummeted from a high of 60% in January to a low of 8% in September.

50 years ago, the Panthers launched their famous Free Breakfast Program. Since October is Black Panther History Month, Brian Watt went to Oakland to learn more about the breakfast program from the party’s archivist.

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A brainless, bright-yellow organism that can solve mazes and heal itself is making its debut at a Paris zoo this weekend.

At least so far, “the blob” is more benevolent than the ravenous star of its 1950s sci-fi film classic namesake.

PG&E said power shutoffs will be a regular thing for the next 10 years. That’s how long it’ll take for the utility to do all the work required to “harden” its electricity transmission infrastructure. PG&E’s CEO Bill Johnson revealed this on Friday at an emergency hearing called by its utility regulators, the California Public Utilities Commission.

Los Angeles has long been known as a city where the car is king and the needs of pedestrians and cyclists can be ignored. But things are changing. Over the weekend, the city’s Department of Transportation conducted its first-ever count of people who walk and bike on L.A.’s streets as a way to improve safety.

When the state legalized the recreational use of marijuana, it was supposed to shrink the state’s illicit cannabis trade. But California’s marijuana black market continues to be larger than the legal one. Weedmaps is sometimes blamed for this. The online marketplace connects cannabis customers with dispensaries and delivery services. The state accuses Weedmaps of selling ads to illegal pot shops. And the Bureau of Cannabis Control has sent it a cease and desist order. Weedmaps promises it will have black market vendors off its site by the end of the year.

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Tonight HBO premieres a new four-part miniseries called "Catherine The Great" starring Helen Mirren as the 18th century Russian empress. Our TV critic David Bianculli has this review.

In the 1960s, Janis Joplin was an icon of the counterculture, a female rock star at a time when rock was an all-boys' club.

"At that point in time there weren't too many women taking center stage," biographer Holly George-Warren says. "Janis created this incredible image that went along with her amazing vocal ability. ... [She] was very, very different than most of the women that came before."

Brain scientists are offering a new reason to control blood sugar levels: It might help lower your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

“There’s many reasons to get [blood sugar] under control,” says David Holtzman, chairman of neurology at Washington University in St. Louis. “But this is certainly one.”

The U.S. may now keep some troops in northeast Syria, Defense Secretary Mark Esper said on Monday. It is the latest in a series of consequential pivots that the Trump administration has made in its Syria policy.

You can stream this playlist on Spotify.

Letting a song take you away has become increasingly difficult. Using music to get through life often means multitasking while you listen; getting ready, commuting, working, studying, showering, practicing, cooking, eating, cleaning...

Letting your thoughts swim in its zenosyne to a curated soundtrack almost sounds like a luxury.

When Fertility Doctors Betray Trust

20 hours ago

Both Matt White and Heather Woock grew up thinking they knew who their respective parents were. Then, in their mid-thirties, both discovered that fertility doctors that their respective mothers had visited had secretly used their own semen while conducting treatments.

The rap on Mitt Romney is that though he isn't a fan of President Trump, when he speaks out, it's in a fairly lukewarm way.

And then it was revealed over the weekend that he's been behind an anonymous Twitter account under the nom de plume Pierre Delecto.

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