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Brain scientists are offering a new reason to control blood sugar levels: It might help lower your risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

"There's many reasons to get [blood sugar] under control," says David Holtzman, chairman of neurology at Washington University in St. Louis. "But this is certainly one."

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At World Famous HotBoys, I once felt the sweat beading on my forehead just from watching someone eat their “hot”-level fried chicken sandwich. To personally consume a “hella hot” sandwich would mean giving the world my best impression of an erupting volcano.

Some people just love the burn; I’m not one of them.

PG&E’s CEO: Power Shutoffs Were ‘Surgical’ During Widespread Wind Event

With more power shutoffs on the horizon for this week, The California Report co-host Lily Jamali interviewed Pacific Gas and Electric’s CEO Bill Johnson. He says the scope of the recent power shutoffs was right, but they could have delayed pulling the switch.Guest: Bill Johnson, PG&E CEO

Weedmaps CEO on Efforts to Remove Black Market Dispensaries

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

Three of the biggest U.S. drug distributors and a drug manufacturer have reached a last-minute deal with two Ohio counties to avoid what would have been the first trial in a landmark federal case on the opioid crisis.

Summit and Cuyahoga counties announced Monday morning that the tentative deal amounts to roughly $260 million.

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This year’s race for San Francisco District Attorney has been a doozy. The four-way race to replace George Gascón is wide open. The Nov. 5 elections took on some extra controversy this month when Gascón abruptly resigned. The next day, Mayor London Breed named Suzy Loftus interim DA — just weeks before the polls close. What does this mean for the city? And why the DA position is way more important than you might think.

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Uganda explicitly bars government officials from accepting gifts of any kind from cigarette-makers. French and British officials must publicly announce any encounters with representatives of the industry. Thailand and the Philippines won't even let officials take a meeting except under the narrowest of circumstances.

These are some of the measures deployed by countries around the world to limit influence over their anti-smoking policies, according to the first-ever Global Tobacco Industry Interference Index.

October marks the start of a new flu season, with a rise in likely cases already showing up in Louisiana and other spots, federal statistics show.

The advice from federal health officials remains clear and consistent: Get the flu vaccine as soon as possible, especially if you're pregnant or have asthma or another underlying condition that makes you more likely to catch a bad case.

In France, McDonald's is often a symbol of everything that's despised about American capitalism and fast-food culture. One Paris neighborhood battled for years to keep the golden arches from settling in between its traditional butchers and bakers (it eventually lost). And the actions of an anti-globalization farmer named José Bové, who tried to dismantle a McDonald's 20 years ago, are legendary.

But for the last year, a group of McDonald's employees in the southern French city of Marseille has been fighting to save its McDonald's restaurant.

The last time Samya Stumo's family heard from her, she had sent a text letting them know she was about to board an Ethiopian Airlines flight from Addis Ababa to Nairobi. She would write again when she got there, she promised.

But the 24-year-old from western Massachusetts was among 157 people who were killed when the flight crashed last March.

For her family, it was the start of a painful, grief-choked odyssey that has turned them and dozens of other families into reluctant activists, taking on federal regulators and Boeing over the crashes of two 737 Max airplanes.

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It is Election Day in Canada after what has been an unusually close and really divisive campaign. David McGuffin reports from Ottawa.

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Brain scientists say there is a new reason to keep your blood sugar levels under control. Doing so might help lower your risk for Alzheimer's disease. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports from the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Chicago.

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The agreement to pause fighting between Turkish and Kurdish forces for five days expires tomorrow.

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The U.S. ambassador to China is pushing back against Beijing's criticism of a new State Department requirement that Chinese diplomats must report certain meetings they have in the U.S.

The State Department announced Wednesday that it is requiring all Chinese diplomats in the U.S. to notify them of meetings they plan to have with local and state officials as well as educational and research institutions. However, there is no penalty associated yet with failing to report such meetings.

A combination of preconceptions, stereotypes and misunderstandings keeps many students from fulfilling their potential as scientists, a Stanford education professor asserts in a new book called “Science in the City.” 

A combination of preconceptions, stereotypes and misunderstandings keeps many students from fulfilling their potential as scientists, a Stanford education professor asserts in a new book called “Science in the City.” 

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