The Latest News from NPR

Test URL headline

Aug 10, 2020

fdasfads

Copyright 2020 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

On Dec. 9, 1871, the San Francisco Chronicle ran a story about a “specter” that had appeared in the upstairs window of a house on Mason Street. The ghostly face had been scaring neighbors for five days at that point, and as word spread, hundreds of people from all over the city flocked to see it, gridlocking an entire stretch of North Beach.

Hundreds of people looted high-end shops on Chicago's Magnificent Mile overnight and early Monday morning with police officers exchanging gunfire with at least one individual, according to Chicago officials.

Law enforcement officials say the violence was linked to social media calls for looting after police shot and injured a male suspect in Englewood, on the city's South Side, on Sunday afternoon.

California’s Top Public Health Official Abruptly Resigns

Director of California’s Public Health Department Sonia Angell stepped down from her position last night. Angell’s resignation comes just days after it was announced that the state had a backlog of as many as 300,000 coronavirus test results.

Ventura County’s Godspeed Cavalary Chapel Remains Defiant Against Restraining Order

If you’re stir-crazy from months of social distancing and sheltering at home, we have some good news: the Perseid meteor shower is back! It’s a chance to break from your routine, get outside, and see something beautiful in the night sky.

In early June, as Gov. Jay Inslee was overseeing a phased reopening of the state, his budget office signed a contract with the elite international consulting firm McKinsey & Company to provide access to a “Governor’s Decision Support Tool.” That tool was meant to aid Inslee’s decision-making as he gradually unlocked the economy.

Republicans up for reelection in key Western states could be facing an uncomfortable vote soon as President Trump's controversial nominee to head the Bureau of Land Management is expected to come before the Senate for confirmation.

More than 21,000 people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in Oregon, and the pandemic’s far-reaching impacts have touched nearly every corner of life across the Pacific Northwest. That will be exceedingly clear in Salem Monday, when the state Legislature convenes for its second special legislative session in two months.

Across 15,000 square miles of rural Oregon, one judge presides.

He routinely shuttles over the mountains and canyons separating courthouses in Grant and Harney counties, 70 miles apart. His authority covers an area twice the size of New Jersey, with just 0.2% its population.

Two stories of the Black Lives Matter movement are unfolding side by side in Portland.

One garners global headlines and prompts tweets from the president, as protesters gather nightly outside government buildings or the police union for clashes marked by vandalism and fireworks on one side, tear gas and crowd control weapons on the other.

A farmer from Shandong province along China's east coast, Liu recalls how during Chinese Lunar New Year in January, he went out for a walk and came home to discover local officials preparing to demolish his home.

When he called the police on the demolishers, they arrested him instead, saying that the police would "assist the work of the local government."

"To demolish my home, about 100 security officers surrounded and subdued me, and detained me," Liu said on a recent visit to his village, Liushuanglou, near the city of Heze. He was released from detention the next day.

Copyright 2020 KCUR 89.3. To see more, visit KCUR 89.3.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

California is getting older faster than the rest of the country and demand for care facilities is rising. Meanwhile, critics say the laws governing emergency preparedness are weak and enforcement is lax. A KQED investigation has found thousands of these facilities are at risk for wildfire. 

When the ominous beep of an emergency alert roused Mark and Kathy Allen out of bed in Sebastopol on Oct. 9, 2017, the Tubbs Fire was heading toward Santa Rosa.

Copyright 2020 Oregon Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit Oregon Public Broadcasting.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This guide is part of our Older and Overlooked series on the danger wildfires pose to California’s older population, especially during COVID-19. Skip straight to:

The questions experts recommend asking
How to research a care home

Many senior care homes in the Bay Area are in fire risk areas, according to a KQED investigation. These facilities are supposed to have emergency plans for disasters like wildfires in order to evacuate the mostly older people with medical conditions who live in them. But with dangerous fire season months approaching, and a pandemic in full swing, some worry that many assisted living homes aren’t prepared. 

Guest: Molly Peterson, KQED Science reporter

The average age of those who died in the 2018 Camp Fire was 72. The average age of those who died in the fires that burned across Sonoma and Napa a year before: 73.

As wildfires grow more devastating in California, some of the most vulnerable are older people who live independently and who live in long-term care homes.

We wanted to examine the risk fire posed to older people because we know that California projects its population to grow grayer faster than the rest of the country.

If you told Brian Dzenis three years ago he would be loading postal semis for work, he would have laughed in your face. A former sports reporter at the now-defunct Youngstown Vindicator, affectionately known as the Vindy, Dzenis, 31, has spent the time after his layoff as a second-shift loader for FedEx, and an expediter for the United States Postal Service.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The United States is the first country in the world to surpass 5 million people diagnosed with COVID-19.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

This is what it sounded like in the streets of Beirut over the weekend...

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Crosstalk).

Copyright 2020 WFAE. To see more, visit WFAE.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Some news in the United States now. Yesterday's earthquake in North Carolina was the state's largest in more than a century. Here's Nick de la Canal from member station WFAE in Charlotte.

Copyright 2020 NET Radio. To see more, visit NET Radio.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Cruz Santos thought her life was finally turning around in early March when she found a job at a shoe store after months of looking.

Two weeks later, the store shut down, throwing her back onto the unemployment lines, and leaving her and her three school-age kids at risk of losing the one-bedroom Bronx apartment where they live.

"I don't know what's going to happen and if they're going to kick me out of my apartment. And that's something hard, you know. You can hardly even sleep sometimes," Santos says.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

New Zealand has gone 100 days without a locally transmitted COVID-19 case - 100 days. But Prime Minister Jacinda Arden is telling people not to get complacent.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2020 WABE 90.1. To see more, visit WABE 90.1.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Two of the country's most pro-Trump districts have Republican congressional primary runoffs on Tuesday. They are both in north Georgia. And here's Emma Hurt of member station WABE with details.

Back in the days before the coronavirus pandemic, lots of people found community and comfort in singing together, whether at school, as a form of worship, in amateur groups or performing as professionals. Last year, Chorus America reported that some 54 million Americans — that is, more than 15% of the entire country's population — participated in some kind of organized group singing. And that study revealed that nearly three-quarters of those polled felt less lonely.

Pages