Rachel Treisman

Protesters including members of Wall of Moms and Don't Shoot Portland are suing the Trump administration over what they describe as a violent and intimidating federal response to nightly demonstrations against systemic racism and police brutality.

Help is on the way for California's Central Valley, where hospitals are inundated with coronavirus patients and local infection rates far outpace the statewide average.

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced a slate of new state and federal resources for eight Central Valley counties in a press briefing on Monday. He also addressed the importance of protecting the populations that are hardest-hit by the virus: essential workers, the Latino community and people who live in congregate settings.

Florida has recorded more coronavirus cases than New York. Only California, the most populous state in the country, has more.

As of Sunday afternoon, data from Johns Hopkins University shows 423,855 people in Florida have tested positive for the coronavirus, compared to 411,736 in New York. California leads with 450,242 cases.

As Texas contends with the ongoing aftermath of one hurricane on Sunday, Hawaii is bracing for the impact of another.

Hurricane Hanna slammed into South Texas on Saturday, making landfall twice as a Category 1 storm. While it was downgraded to tropical storm status early Sunday morning, its relentless rainfall continues to pose a threat.

Updated at 2:45 a.m. ET Saturday

A federal judge on Friday denied the Oregon attorney general's request for a temporary restraining order against certain actions by federal authorities in Portland, saying the state lacked the legal standing to seek that relief.

Newly enrolled international students whose colleges and universities are operating entirely online this fall won't be allowed to enter the U.S. after all.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement confirmed on Friday that its guidance granting visa flexibility to nonimmigrant students only applies to those who were actively enrolled at American schools on March 9.

A federal judge has temporarily blocked federal law enforcement officers deployed to Portland, Ore., from targeting journalists and legal observers at the protests against police violence and racial injustice that have intensified in recent days.

The face covering requirements on two major U.S. airlines just got stricter, with Southwest and American Airlines announcing this week they will end exemptions and step up enforcement.

"According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention one of the best ways we can slow the spread of COVID-19 is to wear a face covering," said Alison Taylor, the chief customer officer of American Airlines. "Customers and team members have been clear that they feel more safe when everyone is wearing a face covering."

Updated at 11:51 p.m. ET

Three Midwestern governors announced statewide face covering mandates on Wednesday, adding Minnesota, Ohio and Indiana to the growing list of states requiring people to mask up in public.

Ohio's order takes effect at 6 p.m. Thursday, Minnesota's starts on Saturday, and Indiana's on Monday.

A Minnesota judge on Tuesday lifted the gag order in the case against four former Minneapolis police officers charged in the death of George Floyd, which sparked nationwide protests and conversations about racial injustice this spring.

Total coronavirus deaths in the U.S. have surpassed 140,000, reaching somber new heights as surging cases continue to break records in parts of the country and around the world.

This spring, 100-year-old Capt. Tom Moore became a national hero in Britain when he raised more than $40 million for health care workers by walking laps in his garden.

On Friday, he became Capt. Sir Tom Moore when he is knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.

A joint mission between NASA and the European Space Agency has yielded the closest photos of the sun ever taken. And with their release on Thursday, these swirly snapshots are newly available to the public.

New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art will reopen its Fifth Avenue location five days a week beginning Aug. 29, with "comprehensive" new health and safety procedures in place.

The country's largest art museum closed on March 13 amid the coronavirus pandemic. In their announcement, Met officials said it had not been closed for longer than three days in more than a century before then.

Ireland is delaying its next phase of reopening, keeping bars closed and extending other restrictions in response to a recent rise in coronavirus cases.

The country was set to enter the fourth and final phase of its incremental reopening plan on July 20. Prime Minister Micheál Martin announced Wednesday that current restrictions will remain in place until Aug. 10.

There will be no Rose Parade on New Year's Day in 2021, marking the first cancellation of the annual spectacle since World War II.

Organizers of the colorful Pasadena, Calif., tradition announced on Wednesday that they would be unable to host the parade in accordance with the state's reopening timeline and "after thoughtful consideration of the restrictions and guidelines in place as a result of COVID-19."

Updated at 2:14 p.m. ET

The family of George Floyd has filed a civil lawsuit against the City of Minneapolis and the four former police officers involved in the Black man's killing on Memorial Day. Civil rights and personal injury attorney Ben Crump, along with co-counsel Antonio Romanucci, announced the lawsuit at a news conference Wednesday in Minneapolis.

Updated at 6:34 p.m. ET

In a swift reversal, the Trump administration has agreed to rescind a directive that would have barred international college students from the U.S. if their colleges offered classes entirely online in the fall semester.

As coronavirus cases continue to climb in the U.S., two governors on opposite sides of the country took a similar step on Monday: reducing the number of people allowed at social gatherings, among other restrictions.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced that indoor social get-togethers of more than 10 people will be prohibited starting Wednesday.

With coronavirus cases and hospitalizations continuing their rise in California, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced on Monday he is reimposing restrictions on many indoor businesses statewide, effective immediately.

Restaurants, wineries, movie theaters, family entertainment centers, zoos, museums and card rooms must suspend their indoor operations, and bars must close altogether.

More than one month after embarking on what he calls a march for "change, justice and equality," Terry Willis on Sunday completed a 1,000-mile walk from his hometown of Huntsville, Ala., to the site of George Floyd's death in Minneapolis.

Willis, a 35-year-old business owner, said he feels obligated as a Black man and father to help create a better future for his son.

Florida reported 15,299 new coronavirus cases on Sunday, marking the largest single-day increase of any state since the start of the pandemic.

Sunday's number exceeds New York's peak of more than 12,200 new cases in one day back in April, when it was the epicenter of the outbreak.

A week before the Texas Republican Party's in-person convention was set to draw thousands to Houston, city officials have hit the brakes.

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner canceled the event on Wednesday, citing safety concerns as the coronavirus continues its record-breaking spread in the region.

There will be no fall sports in the Ivy League this year, officials announced on Wednesday.

This is the latest in a series of coronavirus-related disruptions in the sports world, but the first Division I conference to cancel fall football plans.

Texas reported more than 10,000 new coronavirus cases on Tuesday, smashing its previous record for single-day increases and becoming latest state to reach this grim milestone.

Florida did so earlier in this month and New York in April.

Foreign students attending U.S. colleges that will operate entirely online this fall semester cannot remain in the country to do so, according to new regulations released Monday by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The University of Washington announced on Sunday that at least 112 fraternity house residents north of its Seattle campus have tested positive for COVID-19, bringing the total number of students infected on Greek Row so far to 121.

The nine additional students who tested positive were close contacts of the residents, but do not live in the fraternity houses, according to a statement from The University of Washington.

A third former Minneapolis police officer involved in the killing of George Floyd has been released from jail.

According to Hennepin County jail records, Tou Thao was released from custody with conditions on Saturday morning after posting $750,000 bond.

Protesters in Baltimore pulled down a statue of Christopher Columbus and hurled it into the city's Inner Harbor on Saturday night, adding to the list of monuments toppled during nationwide demonstrations against racism and police brutality.

"Lift Every Voice and Sing" will be played or performed live before every Week 1 NFL game, as the league considers ways to recognize victims of systemic racism.

The song known as the Black national anthem will play at the start of every season opener game, coming before "The Star Spangled Banner," a source familiar with the league's discussions told NPR.

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