Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

A top European court has found faults in how Italian police initially questioned Amanda Knox, an American who was imprisoned for nearly four years in Italy after her roommate was killed, and ordered Italy to pay her damages.

"Ms Knox had been particularly vulnerable, being a foreign young woman, 20 at the time, not having been in Italy for very long and not being fluent in Italian," the European Court of Human Rights said in a statement Thursday.

One of the last remaining Navajo Code Talkers, who relayed messages that were never decoded by enemies in World War II, has died at age 94.

Alfred Newman died Sunday afternoon at a New Mexico nursing home, one of his sons, Kevin Newman, tells NPR.

He says his father was a quiet yet courageous man. "My dad told me that the U.S. was in trouble and when they were calling for him, he needed to answer that call with the armed forces," he says.

A hint of a cotton plant is growing on the moon, inside China's lunar lander, scientists in China say.

Photos released on Tuesday by Chongqing University, in collaboration with the China National Space Administration, show the small, green shoot from a cotton seed reaching out of a latticed container aboard the probe Chang'e-4, named after the Chinese lunar goddess.

Around 40 people have been detained and another two killed in the latest crackdown on Chechnya's LGBT community, Russian activists say.

The "new wave of persecution" started at the end of December, the Russian LGBT Network say in a statement on Monday.

Authorities detained an administrator of a social media group on Russia's VKontakte, where homosexual men from the North Caucasus communicated, the network says.

Updated at 1:45 a.m. ET

A Canadian man who appealed his 15-year prison sentence in China for drug smuggling was instead sentenced to death — a swift ruling that has led some experts to believe Beijing is applying pressure to Canada after last month's arrest of Chinese tech executive Meng Wanzhou in Vancouver.

Seeking to quell concern about the U.S. troop withdrawal from Syria, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Saturday described the American exit as a "tactical change" in military strategy that wouldn't deter efforts to defeat ISIS or hurt U.S. interests in the region.

Pompeo's remarks in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, come after the Pentagon announced Friday that "the process of our deliberate withdrawal" had begun.

China is letting more than 2,000 ethnic Kazakhs drop their Chinese citizenship and leave the country, according to Kazakhstan's Foreign Ministry.

The Associated Press first reported Beijing's decision, which was later confirmed by the ministry.

It's unclear who among the ethnic Kazakh community can leave China or under what circumstances. China's Ministry of Foreign Affairs did not immediately respond to NPR's request for comment.

Iran has confirmed media reports that U.S. Navy veteran Michael R. White is being held in an Iranian prison.

"An American Citizen, named Michael White was arrested a while ago in the city of Mashhad," the spokesperson for Iran's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said, according to the Islamic Republic News Agency. "His arrest was communicated early through Interests Section of The Islamic Republic of Iran to the US government."

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

A Saudi woman who fled her family in hopes of seeking asylum in Australia, only to be detained in Thailand, may receive Australia's protection after all.

Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun, 18, plotted an escape from what she describes as persistent abuse and oppression by family members in Saudi Arabia. She began by boarding a plane by herself to Thailand, but the plan quickly spiraled out of control.

A Venezuelan Supreme Court judge who once supported President Nicolás Maduro has fled to the United States and publicly denounced Maduro's re-election days before the inauguration.

Justice Christian Zerpa left Venezuela with his wife and two daughters, according to Miami broadcaster EVTV. Their destination in the U.S. was unclear.

Defense Secretary James Mattis released a farewell message to all employees on Monday, in the waning hours of his job as Pentagon chief.

"I am confident that each of you remains undistracted from our sworn mission to support and defend the Constitution while protecting our way of life," he wrote.

He said that the Pentagon is at its best "when the times are most difficult," and told them to "keep the faith in our country and hold fast, alongside our allies, aligned against our foes."

Updated at 10:30 a.m.

A U.S. citizen has been arrested in Moscow on suspicion of espionage, Russia's Federal Security Service announced Monday.

The domestic security agency named the detained individual as Paul Whelan. It said in a short statement that he was caught during a spying operation, without adding further details.

The security service said a criminal investigation is underway. If convicted of espionage, Whelan faces up to 20 years in prison.

Friends remember Washington state social worker Alan Naiman as being frugal. He wore old shoes held together with duct tape, bought his apparel at the grocery store, drove jalopies and ate at cheap restaurants. But when he died of cancer in January 2018, at age 63, the people around him learned that he had quietly saved millions for a higher cause.

Naiman left most of his $11 million estate to organizations serving abandoned, impoverished, sick and disabled children.

A 16-year-old is scheduled to graduate from high school in Kansas and Harvard University within the span of two weeks.

Braxton Moral, a senior at Ulysses High School, plans to attend the school's commencement May 19, then the university's ceremonies later in the month, reported The Hutchinson News.

"I'm not any different; I just do a little thing on the side," he told NPR. "I try to play it down at high school because if I talk about it, it becomes a divide."

The United States has lost its oldest World War II veteran. Richard Overton, who fought overseas in a segregated unit, died Thursday at age 112.

Basketball is apparently being embraced by North Korea as a fundamental part of its ideology.

A newspaper there used a "whole page" earlier this week to endorse the sport, South Korean newspaper Chosun Ilbo reported.

"Promoting basketball is not only a sports-related matter, but an important project that upholds the objectives of the [Workers] Party," the North Korean paper reportedly stated. "We must rush to elevate the sport to global levels."

Japan's birthrate has dropped to a historic level, the lowest since data gathering began in 1899.

That's what The Japan Times has reported, citing government figures released Friday.

For years, Japan has seen a decline in its population, leading experts and lawmakers to consider the economic and social repercussions.

When an Amazon customer in Germany contacted the company to review his archived data, he wasn't expecting to receive recordings of a stranger speaking in the privacy of a home.

A new inning has begun for Cuban baseball players, after a historic agreement will allow the athletes to sign with U.S. teams without needing to defect.

Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association announced Wednesday that they had reached an agreement with the Cuban Baseball Federation after years of negotiating.

In its draft for a new constitution, the Cuban government is dropping a controversial amendment that would pave the way for same-sex marriage.

A constitutional commission, led by Cuba's former president Raúl Castro, will remove a gender neutral description of marriage as a union of "two people" with "absolutely equal rights and obligations."

Updated at 5:21 p.m. ET

The streets of Paris were filled with thousands of protesters again on Saturday, in what has become French President Emmanuel Macron's biggest challenge as demonstrations grow more intense.

It's the fourth rally by the gilets jaunes, or "yellow vests," protesters wearing the fluorescent jackets required by French law to be in every vehicle.

Prosecutors have unsealed the first U.S. criminal charges filed since the Panama Papers, a trove of secret documents revealing details of offshore shell-companies, were leaked to reporters and published in 2016.

In a 67-page indictment, the Southern District of New York named four individuals: Ramses Owens, Dirk Brauer, Richard Gaffey and Harald Joachim Von Der Goltz. They are charged on 11 counts, including conspiracy and lying to investigators.

A North Carolina graduate student who led a protest against her university's plan to bring a Confederate statue back to campus has been arrested and charged with inciting a riot and assaulting a police officer.

Maya Little, a 26-year-old graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, turned herself in at the Orange County Courthouse on Tuesday, UNC spokesperson Randy Young told NPR.

Protesters across Israel on Tuesday criticized what they say is the government's failure to address violence against women.

A vocal critic of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte posted bail on Monday, after returning to her country to face an arrest warrant and charges of tax violations.

On Sunday night at Manila's international airport, Maria Ressa, the CEO and executive editor of digital news outlet Rappler, thanked reporters for showing up to cover the event.

Enough confusion has clouded a North Carolina congressional race that the state's board of elections has announced a delay in certifying that Republican Mark Harris defeated Democrat Dan McCready in the state's 9th District because of "claims of irregularities and fraudulent activities."

Updated at 9:00 p.m.

The current and former U.S. presidents have been offering their condolences and paying tribute to the 41st president, George Herbert Walker Bush, who died Friday night at his Houston home. He was 94.

President Trump shot down reports on Saturday that his administration was considering extraditing a Pennsylvania-based foe of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in order to diffuse tensions between Turkey and Saudi Arabia.

Erdogan says Fethullah Gulen, a Turkish cleric who has been living in Pennsylvania since the late 1990s, was involved in a failed coup in 2016. The government has requested the U.S. send him back to Turkey.

Updated at 2:14 p.m. ET on Sunday

The CIA has concluded that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman ordered the killing of outspoken Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, according to media reports.

Protesters across Ireland took to the streets this week chanting and carrying thongs, after a 27-year-old man was acquitted of rape during a trial in which his lawyer cited the lacy underwear worn by his 17-year-old accuser.

"You have to look at the way she was dressed," defense attorney Elizabeth O'Connell said, according to the Irish Examiner. "She was wearing a thong with a lace front."

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