Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman is a reporter and editor, working mainly on breaking news for NPR's digital and radio platforms.

He brings to NPR years of experience as a journalist at a variety of news organizations based all over the world. He came to NPR from The Associated Press in Bangkok, Thailand, where he worked as an editor on the news agency's Asia Desk. Prior to that, Neuman worked in Hong Kong with The Wall Street Journal, where among other things he reported extensively from Pakistan in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He also spent time with the AP in New York, and in India as a bureau chief for United Press International.

A native Hoosier, Neuman's roots in public radio (and the Midwest) run deep. He started his career at member station WBNI in Fort Wayne, and worked later in Illinois for WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford and WILL in Champaign-Urbana.

Neuman is a graduate of Purdue University. He lives with his wife, Noi, on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland.

Updated at 4:20 p.m. ET

A string of tiny Caribbean islands have been left stunned and devastated by the destructive force of Hurricane Irma, one of the strongest storms ever to hit the region. Some islands appear to have been spared, but others suffered loss of life and damage on a near-apocalyptic scale.

Antigua and Barbuda

Updated 3:20 a.m. ET Thursday

France's Interior minister says Hurricane Irma has killed at least eight people and left 23 injured on French Caribbean island territories. The Associated Press reports:

Speaking on French radio France Info, Gerard Collomb said the death toll in Saint-Martin and Saint-Barthelemy could be higher because rescue teams have yet to finish their inspection of the islands. Collomb said Thursday: "The reconnaissance will really start at daybreak."

President Trump's decision to rescind an Obama-era policy deferring action against children of undocumented immigrants is drawing scattered protests around the country.

Hours before Attorney General Jeff Sessions made the widely anticipated announcement to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, better known as DACA, hundreds of demonstrators gathered outside the White House. They shouted "We are America" and "We want education. Down with deportation."

Russian President Vladimir Putin said Tuesday that North Korea's Kim Jong Un would have his people "eat grass" before giving up his nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs.

Putin was attending a meeting in Xiamen, China, of leaders of five emerging economic powers known as BRICS – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa.

Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET

Chicago-based Tronc, the newspaper chain that owns The Chicago Tribune, has struck a deal to buy The New York Daily News.

The venerable tabloid, long a staple of New York's working class and subway patrons, will reportedly be purchased for $1 and the assumption of operational and pension liabilities, according to The Chicago Tribune.

One of the last vestiges of Hong Kong's colonial past is going silent. The territory's public broadcaster will pull the plug on a 24-hour stream of the BBC World Service, replacing it with state-controlled media from China.

Kensington Palace has issued an official announcement that the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, William and Kate, are expecting their third child.

A statement from the palace said "The Queen and members of both families are delighted with the news."

The statement also added that the duchess was suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum, a severe form of morning sickness that afflicted her during two previous pregnancies.

Updated at 11:20 p.m. ET

The governors of Florida and Puerto Rico have declared pre-emptive states of emergency ahead of Hurricane Irma, a powerful Category 4 storm churning through the Caribbean on a westward track. The U.S. Virgin Islands also declared a state of emergency.

Forecasters say the dangerous storm also looks increasingly likely to hit the U.S. East Coast, either in South Florida or the Carolinas.

"We have established protocols for the safety of all," Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rossello said, urging islanders to take precautions.

Brief rain showers may have allowed firefighters in California to get the upper hand on what's been described as the largest wildfire in Los Angeles history.

Fueled by record-setting heat, the blaze has cut a swath through parts of Southern California. Meanwhile, multiple blazes elsewhere in the West have caused evacuations in Montana's Glacier National Park and prompted rescues of holiday hikers who spent a night trapped in the woods along the Columbia River Gorge Trail in Oregon.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley tells the U.N. Security Council that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is "begging for war," with the latest nuclear test that Pyongyang says is its first fusion device, a much more powerful weapon than it has exploded in the past.

"Enough is enough. War is never something the United States wants. We don't want it now. But our country's patience is not unlimited," Haley told an emergency session of the 15-member Security Council in New York.

President Trump is imposing a new round of economic sanctions that are aimed squarely at choking off money to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's regime but "carefully calibrated" to preserve U.S. oil imports from the South American country, according to the White House.

The latest sanctions — the fourth round in recent weeks — are the first to move beyond freezing the assets of individuals and target the government itself.

Updated at 6:30 a.m. ET Saturday

More than 211,000 people were without power along the Gulf Coast of Texas early Saturday as Hurricane Harvey slowly made its way inland.

"Harvey is expected to slow down through the day and meander over southeastern Texas through the middle of next week," the National Hurricane Center reported at 4 a.m. Central time.

Instead of enforcing limits on fishing, wildlife officials in Washington state are doing just the opposite – they're asking the public to catch as many fish as they can, regardless of size. Atlantic salmon, that is.

With an eye on the future of online retailing, Walmart and Google are teaming up to go after rival Amazon in a play that also targets the growing market for voice-activated shopping.

Starting next month, Walmart customers will be able to access hundreds of thousands of products from the company's shelves — everything from dishwashing soap to dining tables — via the online retailing service Google Express. Until now, Walmart's enormous inventory was available online only through the company's own website.

An airstrike apparently targeting Houthi rebels hit a hotel north of Yemen's capital, Sanaa, killing dozens of people.

Al-Masirah TV, a network run by the rebels who control the capital, said more than 40 people were killed in the strike in Arhab. But The Associated Press, citing Yemeni officials and witnesses, put the number of fatalities at about 60.

The AP writes:

Muslim men in India will no longer be able to terminate their marriages in a matter of moments, after a split decision by the country's Supreme Court overruled the practice of "triple talaq."

Previously, Muslim men (and only men) could irrevocably end their marriages by repeating "talaq," the Arabic word for "divorce," three times. Women's rights advocates in India have fought to end the practice.

Six years after a fatal crash caused China to throttle back its high-speed rail service, the country is relaunching the world's fastest inter-city lines, including one between Beijing and Shanghai that cuts an hour off the current travel time.

The operating speed of the new bullet trains, known as "Fuxing," or "Rejuvenation," will be 217 mph, according to Chinese media.

A commuter train outside Philadelphia smashed into a parked train car, hurting 42 passengers early Tuesday, but an official said none of the injuries were life-threatening.

The collision happened just after midnight at the 69th Street Terminal Center in Upper Darby, Pa., about 10 miles west of Philadelphia, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority spokeswoman Heather Redfern told Reuters.

The Norristown High Speed Line train was pulling into the station when it hit a second, unoccupied train car. The operator was among those injured, she said.

Updated at 8:45 a.m. ET

The commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet says Navy divers have found remains of some of the 10 sailors aboard the USS John S. McCain who were missing after the guided-missile destroyer collided with a merchant vessel in waters off Singapore earlier this week.

Adm. Scott Swift said the remains were found in compartments on the ship that were "significantly damaged" in Monday's collision, which left a gaping hole in the ship's port side.

Updated at 2:25 p.m. ET

Police have shot and killed Younes Abouyaaqoub, the alleged driver of a van that plowed into pedestrians last week in Barcelona, Catalonia's president confirmed Monday. He said the suspect was wearing what turned out to be a fake explosives belt.

The U.S. State Department says it will temporarily stop issuing nonimmigrant visas to Russians in response to Moscow's decision to force the U.S. to slash its diplomatic and technical staff in Russia.

The American Embassy in Moscow and consulates elsewhere in Russia are cancelling interviews for visa requests and suspending all nonimmigrant visa operations until Sept. 1, NPR's Michele Kelemen reports. After that date, the issuance of nonimmigrant visas will resume at the embassy in Moscow, but not at the other consulates, Michele says.

One person is dead and at least one other injured after a van rammed into two separate bus shelters in the French port city of Marseille. Authorities say they are not treating the incident as terrorism.

The vehicle hit people waiting at the bus stops a few blocks apart along the city's scenic waterfront.

A police source tells Reuters that the driver has been taken into custody. The 35-year-old suspect has psychological issues and is known to authorities for petty crimes, the source says.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

An international air-sea rescue has been launched in waters off Singapore for 10 missing U.S. sailors after a collision between the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker.

Arthur J. Finkelstein, a longtime GOP pollster and strategist credited with helping elect Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan, has died at age 72 of lung cancer, his family says.

Finkelstein, considered less flamboyant but arguably more influential than better known Republican strategists, such as Lee Atwater and Roger Ailes, is widely regarded as the man responsible for turning the word "liberal" into a pejorative to be wielded against Democrats. He was also considered a pioneer in developing political action committees to raise vast sums of money for campaigns.

The head of the Catholic Church in the Philippines has harshly criticized a government campaign of alleged extrajudicial killings of drug suspects that has claimed thousands of lives, calling it a "humanitarian concern" that cannot be ignored.

For 72 years since the cruiser USS Indianapolis sank after being struck by Japanese torpedoes in the waning days of World War II, its exact resting place had been a mystery.

But a team of researchers led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen now says they have positively identified the wreckage, 18,000 feet below the surface in the Philippine Sea.

Updated at 11:10 a.m. ET

A Catholic Mass was held in Barcelona on Sunday to honor the victims of last week's terror attacks, as authorities continued a manhunt for at least one suspect in the killings of 14 people along Spain's northeast Mediterranean coast.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Barcelona that thousands attended the Mass, held in Spanish and Catalan languages, at the city's iconic Sagrada Familia Basilica. Among those present were King Felipe and Queen Letizia.

At least seven people were wounded by a man with a knife who went on a stabbing rampage in the northern Russian city of Surgut.

No one was killed in the attack in the central Siberian city, but four people were in serious condition, according to state-run Tass news agency, which cited a regional health official.

Islamic State says the man — shot dead by police — was a "soldier" of the extremist group. However, Russian authorities say psychiatric information on the assailant is being sought, suggesting they believe the claim by ISIS may be opportunistic.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

A small number of right-wing "Free Speech Rally" demonstrators disbanded early from Boston Common after they were confronted by thousands of counterprotesters shouting anti-Nazi and anti-KKK slogans.

Deborah Becker, a reporter with member station WBUR in Boston, said that "a few dozen" rally attendees were escorted from Parkman Bandstand by police and placed into police vehicles "for their own safety."

A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was removed from the entrance to Duke University Chapel early Saturday by order of the university president who said in a letter that the move was not only a safety measure but also meant to express the "abiding values" of the school.

The decision to remove the statue from the Durham, N.C., campus, comes after it was defaced on Wednesday and follows violent clashes last week in Charlottesville, Va., between right-wing extremists and counterprotesters over plans to remove another statue of Lee.

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