Vanessa Romo

Vanessa Romo is a reporter for NPR's News Desk. She covers breaking news on a wide range of topics, weighing in daily on everything from immigration and the treatment of migrant children, to a war-crimes trial where a witness claimed he was the actual killer, to an alleged sex cult. She has also covered the occasional cat-clinging-to-the-hood-of-a-car story.

Before her stint on the News Desk, Romo spent the early months of the Trump Administration on the Washington Desk covering stories about culture and politics – the voting habits of the post-millennial generation, the rise of Maxine Waters as a septuagenarian pop culture icon and DACA quinceañeras as Trump protests.

In 2016, she was at the core of the team that launched and produced The New York Times' first political podcast, The Run-Up with Michael Barbaro. Prior to that, Romo was a Spencer Education Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism where she began working on a radio documentary about a pilot program in Los Angeles teaching black and Latino students to code switch.

Romo has also traveled extensively through the Member station world in California and Washington. As the education reporter at Southern California Public Radio, she covered the region's K-12 school districts and higher education institutions and won the Education Writers Association first place award as well as a Regional Edward R. Murrow for Hard News Reporting.

Before that, she covered business and labor for Member station KNKX, keeping an eye on global companies including Amazon, Boeing, Starbucks and Microsoft.

A Los Angeles native, she is a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, where she received a degree in history. She also earned a master's degree in Journalism from NYU. She loves all things camaron-based.

Time is running out for the city of Atlanta, which was given until Wednesday to pay off the cyberattackers who laid siege to city government data and are threatening to wipe the computers clean.

The California Department of Justice will join the investigation of the fatal shooting of Stephon Clark, who was gunned down by two police officers after a chase that ended with the unarmed man dead in his grandparents' backyard earlier this month.

The family of Stephon Clark, a 22-year-old unarmed black man fatally shot by police in his grandparents' back yard, on Monday urged the Sacramento, Calif., district attorney's office to bring criminal charges against the two officers who killed him.

Updated at 2:00 a.m. ET Tuesday

Linda Brown, who as a schoolgirl was at the center of the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case that rejected racial segregation in American schools, died in Topeka, Kan., Sunday afternoon. She was 76.

Her sister, Cheryl Brown Henderson, confirmed the death to The Topeka Capital-Journal.

Martin Vizcarra, who until Friday morning served as Peru's first vice president and ambassador to Canada, has been sworn in as the country's new president.

During the ceremony, Vizcarra pledged to take up a "head on" fight against corruption, even as his predecessor, who when elected 19 months ago also promised to clamp down on government graft, now faces corruption and vote-buying charges.

There is no greater burn than pretending you've never heard of something when that thing has 2.2 billion monthly active users. And Elon Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, lobbed a fiery zinger at the world's leading social-media behemoth Friday when he asked on Twitter: "What's Facebook?"

He added fuel to the flame when he later deleted both company pages, becoming another tech billionaire jumping on the #DeleteFacebook movement.

The former Playboy model who is suing for the right to talk about her alleged affair with Donald Trump, before he was president, is not waiting for a court or judge to free her from a contract she says was contrived for the sole purpose of killing the story of the 10-month relationship.

In an interview with CNN's Anderson Cooper on Thursday evening, Karen McDougal said Trump tried to pay her after the first time they had sexual relations.

The police officer who was hospitalized after rushing to help a former Russian spy and his daughter suffering from a poison attack in Salisbury, England, was discharged Thursday.

In a statement released by police, Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey said he needs more time to regroup and recover but that normal life "will never be the same."

Les Payne, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who spent his career at Newsday expanding coverage beyond local issues to include international stories first as a reporter, then as a columnist and editor — all while vehemently crusading for racial equality — has died at his home in Harlem, N.Y. He was 76.

Payne's son Jamal told Newsday that the retired journalist was working on a book about Malcom X when he had a heart attack in his home office Monday evening.

Previously dismissed by President Trump and his allies after alleging sexual affairs or unwanted sexual advances by the real estate tycoon, a number of women are asking the courts to help them break their silence.

For years Harjit Masih has been talking about what happened outside of the Iraqi city of Mosul, the Associated Press reported. He and 39 other Indian men — all construction workers working on the Mosul University campus — had been kidnapped by members of ISIS as the extremist group waged its assault on the city.

A nun involved in a years-long legal dispute with pop star Katy Perry over a sprawling 8-acre former convent died in court Friday, according to The Associated Press.

Sister Catherine Rose Holzman, who had battled Perry and the Archdiocese of Los Angeles, was in court for a post-judgment hearing related to the case when she collapsed. She was 89.

The Justice Department has taken the first step in banning the sale, manufacture or possession of bump stocks through new regulation, as Congress stalls in drafting a legislative prohibition.

Syrian government forces delivered another serious blow to eastern Ghouta Saturday after forces seized more ground, further isolating the Damascus suburb that has been controlled by rebel forces and under siege for five years.

Writer Sherman Alexie has decided not to accept a prestigious literary prize he was awarded in February, as he faces multiple allegations of sexual harassment.

Martin Shkreli, the former pharmaceutical executive who has been publicly excoriated for sharply increasing the price of a lifesaving HIV drug and derisively referred to as the "Pharma Bro," was sentenced on Friday to seven years in prison for defrauding investors in two failed hedge funds and a drug company he once

On Wednesday, press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders was fielding questions on steel and aluminium tariffs and on an abnormal exodus of White House staffers.

In each instance, she praised the achievements of the White House and President Trump. And then she let slip something that had, until then, been unknown to the public: Trump had scored a legal victory over a former adult film actress who allegedly had an extramarital affair with the president a decade before he ran for office, according to Sanders.

Rhode Island enthusiasts of free porn may have to start paying for it.

State legislators introduced a bill last week that would require residents to pay a one-time $20 fee to access pornography sites or other "offensive material" online.

As Florida lawmakers draw closer to a vote Wednesday on a gun-safety package aimed at reducing school shootings, families of the 17 victims killed in the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are urging legislators to approve it.

The Senate passed a version of the bill on Monday and now the House is taking it up for what could be the final vote.

If passed, the bill would raise the legal age for buying rifles from 18 to 21, impose a three-day waiting period on all firearms sales and allow qualified school personnel to be armed on campus.

President Trump's proclivity for putting his name on buildings, steaks, ties and certificates is well-known. But former adult film actress Stormy Daniels says he failed to put his name on their contract.

Daniels, whose given name is Stephanie Clifford, filed a civil suit against President Trump on Tuesday alleging the nondisclosure agreement she signed just days before the 2016 election is invalid because it's missing Trump's signature.

Google is facing diverse diversity lawsuits.

A former employee is suing the company for allegedly discriminating against white and Asian male applicants as it tries to boost the number of black, Latino and female staffers.

Tensions at the Trump International Hotel and Tower in Panama City erupted into chaos this week, with teams of security guards attacking each other and police carting off an employee in handcuffs, members of the luxury building's owners association tell NPR.

Amazon really wants to come over to your house. Or at least make it to the front door.

The Seattle-based tech giant announced Tuesday it's made another move into the home security and surveillance business, acquiring Ring, a smart-doorbell maker that streams audio and video to cellphones.

Neither company has released details about the deal but Reuters reported that it cost over $1 billion.

House and Senate Republican lawmakers in Florida unveiled a package of sweeping gun control proposals on Monday, which they hope to pass before a legislative recess in two weeks.

The measures are aimed at making schools safer for children but present a challenge to the National Rifle Association's grip on the state's Republican leaders, including the self-professed gun-toting governor, who presented his own plan Friday.

Michelle Obama fans can officially start the countdown clock.

Over social media Sunday, the former first lady announced her first memoir, Becoming, will be published on November 13. That gives her most dedicated admirers exactly 261 days to start printing "Obama 2020" T-shirts as some are professing to do before storming bookstores.

"Writing BECOMING has been a deeply personal experience," she tweeted to her followers. "I talk about my roots and how a girl from the South Side found her voice."

Two South Korean speedskaters who humiliated their teammate are facing a swift backlash from fans who are demanding the women be banned from the national team. The fans' petition has gathered more than 579,000 signatures over two days.

The painful drama played out on the ice on Monday during the pursuit team quarterfinals race when Noh Seon-Yeong was left behind by the two faster women on the team, leaving Noh to cross the finish line roughly four seconds later — a glacial delay in the sport.

Throughout his career as a preacher, the Rev. Billy Graham's message of faith drew massive crowds of believers to tents, arenas and stadiums. Next week, mourners will have a final opportunity to turn out for Graham.

His casket will lie in honor in the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Feb. 28, and Thursday, March 1.

In the seven days that have followed the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people, students from the Florida campus have moved from terror to grief to activism, inspiring a national youth-led protest against political inaction on gun reform.

On Wednesday, the Parkland students — still mourning and fueled by anger — made their way to the state capitol in Tallahassee to confront lawmakers to demand a ban on assault weapons.

A Thai court on Tuesday granted sole custody of 13 children to a reclusive Japanese businessman who fathered the babies through surrogates, putting an end to a bizarre and controversial legal battle involving the man police called a "baby-factory."

For a company that's all about the future of communication, Facebook is looking to the past to solve at least some of its problems.

After months of intense scrutiny over the role the company played in the 2016 presidential election, the social network giant announced it wants to use postcards to verify the identity of advertising buyers to prevent future foreign meddling.

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