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Why are coronavirus cases so much higher here in the United States than other countries?

For Andy Slavitt, former acting administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services under President Obama, the fundamental issue at play isn't simply a slow turnaround for virus test results or mask mandates.

He blames a widespread erosion of fundamental trust at all levels of society.

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Merry Collins lost her job as a home health aide in Dallas after the coronavirus outbreak hit. Before she started getting $600 a week in extra federal unemployment benefits, she got behind on the rent. And in June her landlord took her to court to evict her.

"The first day the courts opened here in Dallas," she says, "that's when they filed for eviction."

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President Trump has told Republicans to scrap plans for a celebration event in Jacksonville, Fla., as part of this year's GOP convention.

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Good morning. I'm David Greene.

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Updated at 11:34 a.m. ET

New claims for unemployment benefits rose last week for the first time in four months — since March 28 — as states began reimposing lockdown restrictions in an effort to reverse a surge of coronavirus cases.

More than 1.4 million new claims were filed during the week ending July 18, an increase of more than 100,000 over the week before, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

Quinton Lucas, the mayor of Kansas City, Mo., says he found out about President Trump's plan to send federal law enforcement officers to his city over social media.

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Tommy Rhine, 70, has been repairing shoes in Denver for more than 40 years. He's repaired shoes for everyone from Broncos and Nuggets players to doctors and lawyers at Rhine's Shoe & Boot Repair.

But three months of the COVID-19 pandemic almost forced Rhine to shut his doors.

"I mostly deal with downtown businesspeople," Rhine said. "Half of them are not working or if they are working, they are working at home. They don't need to dress up or have the shoes right now so that kind of killed everything."

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Now a story about a trumpeter who is hoping that music might help reduce gun violence...

SHAMARR ALLEN: My name is Shamarr Allen. I'm a trumpeter from New Orleans, La., a producer, songwriter, singer.

Dr. Louis Tran, an emergency physician, spend much of May in New York City ICUs treating patients with COVID-19. Now, he's back at home in San Bernardino County in California, fighting the same virus on a different coast.

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The head of Jordan's government has a warning for Israel and for its ally the United States. Jordan's prime minister spoke with Steve Inskeep.

Gwinnett County Public Schools in Georgia is one of a growing number of K-12 school districts around the country deeming it too dangerous to teach students in person when classes restart this fall.

The school district — the state's largest — announced earlier this week that it would transition to all-virtual learning, reversing its previous plan to hold a mix of in-person and virtual classes.

Superintendent J. Alvin Wilbanks said the change came down to prioritizing safety – and that will guide any decision to revert to in-person learning.

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Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET

The U.S. has ordered China to close its consulate in Houston, in what China called an "unprecedented escalation."

In a statement early Wednesday, State Department spokesperson Morgan Ortagus said: "We have directed the closure of [People's Republic of China] Consulate General Houston, in order to protect American intellectual property and American's (sic) private information."

With peak hurricane season yet to come, southeast communities are grappling with uncertainty over whether it's possible to evacuate to shelters without risking coronavirus exposure.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has unanimously voted to shut down the state's iconic Apalachicola oyster fishery after years of drought and other pressures have devastated wild oyster beds.

For decades, if you ordered oysters on the half-shell on the eastern Gulf coast, they most likely came from Apalachicola Bay – an estuary in north Florida where freshwater rivers meet the Gulf of Mexico, creating the perfect brackish mix for growing plump, salty oysters. But in recent years, they're hard to come by.

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President Trump returned to the coronavirus briefing room yesterday after a hiatus. And he chose some new language when he was talking about the coronavirus.

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Millions of Americans are facing the threat of eviction as a federal moratorium that has protected renters during the pandemic is set to expire Friday.

That eviction moratorium, coupled with unemployment assistance established in the CARES Act, has helped some renters stay in their homes.

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