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Regional Interests

No Hydro Means No Hydroelectric

three-quarters empty." There is a sign by the hydroelectric plant that reads, "sorry, no hydro. Check back later."" width="1920" height="1297" srcset="https://ww2.kqed.org/app/uploads/sites/10/2021/08/empty_080621_final.png 1920w, https://ww2.kqed.org/app/uploads/sites/10/2021/08/empty_080621_final-800x540.png 800w, https://ww2.kqed.org/app/uploads/sites/10/2021/08/empty_080621_final-1020x689.png 1020w, https://ww2.kqed.org/app/uploads/sites/10/2021/08/empty_080621_final-160x108.png 160w, https://ww2.kqed.org/app/uploads/sites/10/2021/08/empty_080621_final-1536x1038.png 1536w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" />

As the water level fell to a record low, the California Department of Water Resources announced the hydroelectric plant at the Oroville Dam would be shut down, blaming “climate-induced drought.”

Oroville Dam (which was dealing with the opposite kind of problem four years ago) is the nation’s tallest dam and one of California’s top producers of hydroelectric power.

Amid scorching temperatures and a megadrought in the West, the reservoir is less than a quarter full.

Or, in pessimistic cartoonist terms, over three-quarters empty.

Copyright 2021 KQED