THROUGH THE EYES OF WOMEN

Colonization, Revitalization and Coming of Age

Aug 7, 2018

"The empowerment of women empowers the whole community." Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy discusses the impact of colonialism on Native women and the coming of age ceremonies for young women which impact the entire community.


Humboldt Cannabis Magazine

Danielle Orr talks with visiting scholar Brenda Perez about her doctoral research on the politics of the cannabis industry.

Brenda's research addresses sociopolitical intersections of the cannabis scene in Michoacan, Mexico and Humboldt County, California.


Amanda Malachesky  is working to understand the links between what we eat and how we feel physically, mentally and emotionally.  She calls it functional nutrition. Amanda spoke with Emma Breacain about transforming the way we approach our health challenges. 


KQED

Over the Thanksgiving weekend in 2016, a few weeks after Trump was elected president, Krista Suh was pondering how she could register her discontent and make an impact at the Women’s March scheduled for January, 2017.  In a flash of inspiration, Krista launched the Pussyhat Project to knit pink cat-eared hats to wear at the Women’s March in Washington D.C.  The project went viral and thousands of hats were knitted and worn at demonstrations around the world.


Look, we don’t want to spoil the ending to the first book in the new Superheroes Club series. We’ll just say that it’s about some kids who manage to perform deeds that are both legitimately heroic, and attainable for the kids reading about them. Ta-da! 

In this conversation, Sherak talks about developing the Superheroes Club and sharing them with her three children and ten grandchildren.


While still practicing law, Pamela Samuels Young began moonlighting as a mystery writer because of the absence of women and people of color depicted in the legal thrillers she so enjoyed reading.

There are so many things we know we should be doing. We can be better. We have to become better! Who doesn’t want a healthy body, a happy family, a fulfilling career, an organized home, and a passion project brought to fruition?

As the U.S. prepares for Thanksgiving next week, many of us think of the image of happy 'Pilgrims and Indians' coming together for a big feast. But what about the rest of the story -- the historical facts versus the Mayflower myths?

This is a condensed version of a Thursday Night Talk program from November 16, 2017. 

Long-time community diabetes activist, diabetes policy advocate and blogger, mother and wife, Christel Marchand Aprigliano believes that to live optimally with a chronic illness, you have to have support from friends, family and peers who live with the day to day, moment to moment challenge of facing something that never goes away.

On this week's Through The Eyes Of Women, Dr. Corinne Frugoni talks with Victoria Sweet about her new book, "Slow Medicine". 

Over the years that Victoria has been a physician, "healthcare" has replaced medicine, "providers" look at their laptops more than their patients, and costs keep soaring. Yet the remedy that economists and policy makers continue to miss is also miraculously simple. Good medicine takes more than amazing technology; it takes time - time to respond to bodies as well as data, time to arrive at the right diagnosis and the right treatment.


The history of Native and Indigenous people in California is told through many lenses. According to Deborah Miranda—author of the book Bad Indians: A Tribal Memoir, the stories of her people and many others who survived decades of persecution and genocide under colonialism, the gold rush and California missions, have not been told by enough native perspectives.


 What is your earliest memory of money?  What did you learn about money from your parents? Why is it easier to talk about sex than money in our culture?  

These are some of the questions that have lived in the back of my mind for a long time.  Kimberley Pittman-Schulz has had a long career in helping people from all walks of life donate to charities that reflect their personal values.  

"Money gets tied up with a sense of self-esteem," she says.

Humboldt State University student Karla Sanchez waited in anticipation on what the Trump administration would decide to do to the DACA program. 

  A trip to Southern Italy in order to solve a mystery of murder involving her great-great-grandmother Vita becomes an account of passion, family, food, and forgiveness for Helene. She captures perfectly the “simultaneous beauty and sadness” of Matera — the instep in the boot of Italy — its midday heat (like “stepping into a pizza oven”), its brutalizing poverty and superstition, its stark, if accidental, symbolism.On her way to the Crypt of the Original Sin, she pauses at the cave dwellings where the poorest of the poor once lived.

Jessica Eden

Dr. Cheryl Johnson - the newly appointed executive director of The Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (ODEI) at Humboldt State University, spoke with KHSU about her new job and the road ahead. 

 In her new book “The Tolerance Trap: How God, Genes and Good Intentions are Sabotaging Gay Equality,” Walters analyzes the journey toward “full citizenship” for gay people with equal parts hope and cynicism. Her message, that while society and government are making exciting, incremental steps toward real progress, “we’re not ‘there’ yet.”

courtesy Scribe Publications

  Nancy MacLean's Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America tells the never-before-told story of James Buchanan, a Nobel prize winning economist who created the intellectual foundation and strategic blueprints behind the billionaire-funded radical right’s campaign to eliminate unions, suppress voting, privatize public education, curb democratic majority rule and ultimately change the Constitution.

 Set in North Carolina during the turbulent Civil Rights Era, The Ada Decades is a lesbian feminist historical novel spanning 70 years with 11 interconnected stories about the life of Ada Jane Shook. Author Paula Martinac calls her new book a historical novel-in-stories which chronicles the life of a school librarian who encounters segregation, the paradox of religion and her true love, Camillia Lively, during the Pre-Stonewall south.

  Health care in America is in deep crisis. One in five working class Americans with health insurance report problems paying medical bills. We have the most expensive healthcare system in the world, almost $10,000 per person.  Yet we’re number 28 in life expectancy. 


WhoBombedJudiBari.com

 “Who Bombed Judy Bari?” directed and edited by Mary Liz Thomson and produced by Darryl Cherney covers the story of a particularly violent event that occurred on May 24, 1990 in Oakland, CA, in which a bomb exploded under the driver’s seat of the car which Bari was driving and in which Cherney was a passenger.

Humboldt.edu

 Assistant Professor Dr. Amber Gaffney is a social psychologist whose research focuses on social identity, group processes and social influence.

 Her current work focuses on how prototypical and non-prototypical group members can create and manage uncertainty to enact social change. 

She speaks to TTEOW about the new Social Identity and Influence research lab at HSU where students can get hands-on experience working on every stage of research from hypothesis development to publication and presentation of results.

susannalamainaphotography.com

In 1966 in Oakland California, Huey Newton and Bobby Seale founded the Black Panther Party for Self Defense.  The initial goal was to monitor police violence in black communities, a persistent issue that Black Lives Matter and other contemporary groups continue to organize around today.  In 1969, community social programs became a core activity of party members. The Black Panther Party launched multiple programs such as a free breakfast program for children, food banks, health clinics and education outreach.


Bringing home a new baby means change for everyone, and parenting books tend to tell parents how to help siblings adjust – but – What does it look like from their point of view?

Author Elizabeth Rusch talks to Brenda Starr about getting this new relationship off on the right foot. 

Prostitution and the "Wild West"

Mar 20, 2017

Historian Jan Mackell Collins has written several books plus literally thousands of articles on the history of the West, with a special attention for the women and prostitutes that helped shape the modern America we know.

In books like  “The Wild Women of Prescott Arizona,” and “The Lost Ghost Towns of Teller County (Colorado),”  Jan MacKell Collins busts the technicolor movie image of the loud and proud town prostitute bustling about town saloons. Most of these women had a difficult job that was dangerous and stigmatized.


Eleanor Roosevelt was a reluctant president’s wife. A.P. journalist Lorena Hickok helped her by becoming a confidante, supporter and amorous partner. Author Susan Quinn talks about her research, going through hundreds of pictures and stories and thousands of love letters. She portrays a juicy tale of a long lasting relationship for the ages.

2016 Green Party Presidential Candidate Jill Stein lives and breathes the Green Party Platform for People, Planet and Peace Over Profit. Dr. Stein graduated from Harvard Medical School and spent almost 25 years as a physician and researcher before transitioning into politics and social activism.

Jill Stein spoke with KHSU's Corinne Frugoni this week, ahead of Dr. Stein's March 8th lecture on the Humboldt State campus.
https://khsuwomen.wordpress.com/


  The first annual 02F Festival is kicking off March 2nd in the Creamery District. This festival’s aim is to celebrate creative women in our community. The theme of this year’s festival is Zero to Fierce: an opportunity to discover, inspire, and create.

According to Dr. Victoria Sweet, “In the last 20 years, in the interest of efficiency, the time doctors spend with patients has been cut down to the bone."  

In God’s Hotel: a Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine Victoria Sweet raises fundamental questions about the current practice of medicine based on her observations and work for twenty years at Laguna Honda Hospital in San Francisco, the last almshouse in this country.

 

 Breastfeeding should come naturally and easily.  That’s what many new moms think when they first put their newborn to their breast.  


There will be a celebration of life for Ruth Mountaingrove, founding mother of Through The Eyes of Women.  Sunday, February 12 at 3:00 PMHumboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship  24 Fellowship Way, Bayside CA.

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