WIYOT TRIBE

Wiyot Filmmaker, Michelle Hernandez on Her Film, DOUK

Aug 20, 2018

Michelle Hernandez is a Wiyot tribal member and grew up on the Table Bluff Reservation. She has a soon to be released film titled DOUK, about a family that faces the abduction of their daughters to one of the many Native boarding schools in early 20th century America.

Douk is a historical fiction drama based in the 1910’s era. It tells the story of a young Native girl, Irene, who deals with a difficult reality of her and her sister being taken away from their family and sent to boarding school, where they will be assimilated into the western culture. This means that once this happens, they will no longer be able to practice their language, culture, and traditions. 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Today my guests are Ted Hernandez Tribal Chairman of the Wiyot Tribe; Michelle Vassel, Tribal Administrator; and Tim Nelson, Director of the Natural Resources Department. They are here to talk about the return of Indian Island to the tribe, the cleanup of the contaminated former boatyard at Tuluwat Village, and the recent revival of the tribe’s World Renewal ceremonies that were interrupted in 1860 by brutal massacres. 


On August 25th, the Wiyot Tribe will host Wiyot Day to provide an opportunity for the whole community to come together and celebrate Wiyot Culture and to honor elders and veterans. The event is held at Table Bluff Reservation in Loleta and features dance and cultural demonstrations, a Stick Game, Card Game Tournament, live music, games for kids and a community dinner. Wiyot Tribal Chair, Ted Hernandez, talks about the significance of the event for the Tribe and community.

 

Wiyot Tribe

Tending the Wild...

Adam Canter, botanist with the Table Bluff Natural Resouces Department joins Jennifer Bell for another discussion about the cultivation of traditional Wiyot foods and on-going restoration efforts. 


Wiyot Tribe

On this segment of Food For Thought, Jennifer Bell connects with Adam Canter, botanist with the Table Bluff Natural Resouces Department. They discuss historic cultivation of traditional foods and the Wiyot Tribe's current ecological restoration efforts. 


Food For Thought

In Wiyot country.  

LeeAnn Moore joins Jennifer Bell to talk about growing up eating traditional Wiyot foods.


Lyn Risling

“It’s a real mix of linguists and community activists, scholars and academics and community folks coming together to talk about issues that are important to us," explains Paula Tripp-Allen with the Native American Center For Academic Excellence (ITEPP). The California Indian Conference and California Big Time & Social Gathering takes place  in the HSU Forbes Complex on April 7th. 

Much of Humboldt County's thirst is quenched by the Mad River. And, despite its relatively small size, the Mad River provides vital habitat for a surprising diversity of species. Fisheries Biologist Katherine Osborn shares this week's Sound Ecology audio postcard.


Natalya Estrada

It started with burning of sage and several supporters gathering around the small Security National building on Eureka's fifth street. The building is owned by Rob Arkley, a local real estate tycoon who wanted to purchase a property known as Indian Island from Eureka instead of the city transferring it to the Wiyot Tribe. Within a few hours the crowd multiplied with nearly 100 protesters lining both sides of the street near the E Street intersection.