MY FAVORITE LECTURE

KHSU invites you to a live taping of My Favorite Lecture! The reception at 6, lecture at 7.

Professor Kirby Moss's lecture, titled "Honeymooners to Honey Boo-Boo", will unpack how TV programs portray the white working class. 

He'll discuss how we, as a culture, are so uncomfortable dealing with social class issues, especially void of race. Explore the topic through the lens of television and the media in general. 

Imagine you’re an environmental studies professor. Every semester you're faced with a roomful of idealistic students. You then have to present to them the grim forecast that climate scientists expect. These students may have known the planet faces challenges - but this is bad.  

And that, says Dr. Sarah Jaquette Ray, is where things might go sideways.

KHSU

How do you teach really, really bad news without immobilizing your students?

Dr. Sarah Jaquette Ray of HSU's Environmental Studies Department discusses the emotional arc some of her students have to navigate. 

This episode airs Tuesday, May 1st at 7pm

Learning about climate change can trigger debilitating cycles of eco-grief, despair, and apathy. So how can an educator work with those emotions and still get the lesson across? 

In her upcoming talk for My Favorite Lecture, titled Coming of Age at the End of the World: Eco-Grief, College Students, and Teaching Climate Change, Dr. Sarah Jaquette Ray explores the challenges of teaching depressing material about climate change and social injustice to college students. In response, she has devoted herself to making emotions central to the pedagogy.

Mike Dronkers/KHSU

On this episode of My Favorite Lecture, engineering instructor Lonny Grafman shows how engineers benefit from community engagement.

My Favorite Lecture is back! We're proud to kick the season off with a talk about community-based innovation from author, engineer and educator Lonny Grafman. 

Join the "studio audience" for a taping at  Plaza Grill on Thursday, February 15th.  Lectures are an hour long, preceded by nosh from Arcata Main Street and followed by your questions. The recording airs on KHSU and is found wherever you  get your podcasts. 

KHSU

Overpopulation. Epidemics. Economic recession. Deforestation. Anger toward elites. 

Though the causes of Maya warfare may look straightfoward, piecing together its weaponry, tactics and broader effects is anything but.

Join the studio audience for a recording of My Favorite Lecture April 13th at Plaza Grill in Arcata.  

Marisol Cortes-Rincon will cover the current problems with the archaeology of warfare; the continuity of conflict in Mesoamerica from the Late Preclassic through the Terminal Classic period; the influence of Teotihuacan during the Early Classic period throughout Mesoamerica; and more.

"Behavior is difficult to measure directly because we have to rely on what you tell us. You get upset when we try to watch you,” says Humboldt State's Melinda Meyers.

And when researchers base their gender studies using questionable assumptions, as you’re about to learn, that research gets a little dodgy. 

 

In this lecture, Myers lays out a fun-but-firm critique of sexuality research, and makes clear why it matters. 

Be in the studio audience for a recording of My Favorite Lecture this Thursday evening at Plaza Grill in Arcata.  

Social values and beliefs affect the questions we ask, and the ways in which we seek to answer them.  This effect is readily apparent as it relates to the study of sexuality.  Dr. Myers' lecture will explore how feminist approaches to science encourage us to remember that our experience, expectations, and motivations affect every level of our work.  The method in its purest form may be objective, but we have not demonstrated the ability to apply it to questions of human behavior without implicit bias.  

My Favorite Lecture is an interdisciplinary lecture series in which Humboldt State educators share some of their favorite material with a live community audience in downtown Arcata, California. A Taste of Arcata appetizer reception, courtesy of Arcata Main Street, precedes the lecture. 

KHSU

What are we getting right when it comes to the science of climate change? What are we getting wrong? In this episode of My Favorite Lecture, Dr. Rich Boone takes you on a fact-based jaunt through one of today's most pressing issues. 

UPDATE: This episode will air Wednesday, March 1st at 7pm.

Can't listen live?  Subscribe to the My Favorite Lecture podcast via iTunes.

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Although rapid global climate change is not unusual, the current warming is unprecedented.  Explore what it all means during a taping of My Favorite Lecture on Wednesday, February 15th at Plaza Grill. We kick off season 2  with Climate Change: Facts, Fiction, and Forecasts. 

 Humboldt State's Richard Boone brings a wealth of experience to the podium — he has a strong background in forest ecology, biogeochemistry, and trans-national Arctic education.

Why would invaders bother sacking a museum? Where's the value in plundering art?

Explore the idea of art looting and destruction over time, and understand the significance of such assaults against culture.  

Join Humboldt State Lecturer Julia Alderson for a discussion of art during crisis.   

Throughout history, governments and political groups have looted and destroyed art to serve their propagandistic purposes - from the ancient Romans, to the Nazis under Adolph Hitler, to ISIS’s recent destruction of the ancient site of Palmyra.

For this episode of My Favorite Lecture, Julia Alderson delivers Looting and Destruction: The Politics of Art in Crisis.

Doors open at 6:30 for a Taste of Arcata reception courtesy Arcata Main Street. The lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm. 

[Advisory: Some of the content below maybe be considered graphic, bleak, and/or NSFW.]  

In this episode of My Favorite Lecture, Humboldt State history professor Ben Marschke paints a vivid picture of the spiritual, social, and economic factors that surrounded the witch hunts that led to an estimated 100,000 witch trials and 50,000 executions over hundreds of years. 

Demonology and epistemology collide as Marschke explores the "science" of witchcraft in the sixteenth century, placing witchcraft in the context of contemporary anxieties about gender, sexuality, and fertility.

 

You'll learn about popular handbook Malleus Maleficarum, which was basically the Oxford English Dictionary of how to spot, hunt, and try witches. 

You're invited to be in the "studio" audience for the second episode of My Favorite Lecture, Thursday, October 13th  at Plaza Grill at 7pm.

Ben Marschke's lecture is titled "Witches: Sex & Science in the 16th Century."

You'll explore the "science" of witchcraft in the sixteenth century, when contemporaries blended magic and religion and science.

Marschke places witchcraft in the context of contemporary anxieties about gender, sexuality, and fertility.

KHSU

"If we look at what makes up the universe, it's a little disturbing," Humboldt State University physicist CD Hoyle told the standing-room-only audience in Arcata. "It turns that most of the universe is dark energy." And we don't know what that is. "And that's a problem." 

Physics has problems, and nature is hinting at mysteries as big as the universe itself.  There are contradictions among major models of nature that are, in Hoyle's opinion, downright embarrassing.

Subscribe to the My Favorite Lecture podcast via iTunes

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  Humboldt State University professors deliver their favorite lecture in downtown Arcata this fall, as part of a new broadcast/podcast series.

The series, called “My Favorite Lecture,” will be in front of a live audience. Admission is free, but seating is limited.