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Regional Interests

For some, climate crisis leads to anxiety, depression and grief

A pink sun is barely visible against a smoke-filled sky. The air quality in Portland, OR was ranked the worst of all major cities in the world due to smoke blowing in from several surrounding wildfires. Thursday, Sept. 10, 2020.
A pink sun is barely visible against a smoke-filled sky. The air quality in Portland, OR was ranked the worst of all major cities in the world due to smoke blowing in from several surrounding wildfires. Thursday, Sept. 10, 2020.

Wildfires, extreme heat and other weather events, like the ice storm this past February, have Oregonians thinking about climate change in a much more personal way. We talk with clinical psychologist Thomas Doherty, who helps people cope with anxiety, depression and other mental health issues brought on by the climate crisis. In 2008 and 2009, Doherty served on the American Psychological Association’s Task Force on the Interface Between Psychology and Global Climate Change. He says in the intervening years, he’s had more and more clients come to him looking for help with difficult feelings related to the warming climate and changes in the natural world.

If you’d like to comment on any of the topics in this show or suggest a topic of your own, please get in touch with us on Facebook or Twitter, send an email to thinkoutloud@opb.org, or you can leave a voicemail for us at 503-293-1983. The call-in phone number during the noon hour is 888-665-5865.

Copyright 2021 Oregon Public Broadcasting