Sarah McCammon

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President Biden is wrapping up his work in Brussels today, but he already has his eyes on Geneva.

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President Biden says the United States is back, and that is getting a big test today.

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Joe Biden is on his first overseas diplomatic trip as president.

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Texas Gov. Greg Abbott says he intends to withhold paychecks to state lawmakers after House Democrats staged a walkout to block voting restrictions proposed by their Republican counterparts.

President Biden's budget proposal fulfills a campaign promise to remove a longstanding ban on federal funding for most abortions known as the Hyde Amendment.

Religion, education, race and media consumption are strong predictors of conspiracy theory acceptance among Americans, according to a new survey from the Public Religion Research Institute.

The survey of 5,149 adults living across the United States released on Thursday finds a strong correlation between consuming right-wing media sources and accepting conspiracy theories such as QAnon.

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Updated May 19, 2021 at 5:15 PM ET

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott on Wednesday signed into law a bill that bans abortion the moment a fetal heartbeat has been detected, a move that makes Texas the largest state in the nation to outlaw abortion so early in a pregnancy.

The Texas law effectively prohibits any abortion after around six weeks of pregnancy — before many women are even aware they are pregnant.

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Authorities in North Carolina issued their conclusions today into the fatal shooting of Andrew Brown Jr. by sheriff's deputies

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Friends and family of Andrew Brown Jr. say they will remember him as a devoted and loving father who wanted to give his children things he didn't always have.

"Andrew was a sweetheart," said Monique Gaddy, 52. "He dropped out of school, but he was very adamant about his children getting an education."

Gaddy, like many in Elizabeth City, a small community in coastal North Carolina, knew Brown since he was a small child.

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Seven sheriff's deputies have been placed on administrative leave after Andrew Brown Jr., a Black man, was fatally shot while deputies were carrying out a search and arrest warrant on Wednesday morning in Elizabeth City, N.C. Three other deputies have resigned, the sheriff's office says, but it wasn't related to the incident.

During a press conference streamed online Friday evening, Pasquotank County Sheriff Tommy Wooten II expressed condolences to Brown's family and pledged that if any of his deputies are found to have violated laws or policies, "they will be held accountable."

Not even one full day went by after the conviction of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for George Floyd's murder before another American Black man was killed by police.

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Fetal tissue is uniquely valuable to medical researchers - useful for developing treatments and better understanding diseases like HIV, Parkinson's, and COVID-19.

But many anti-abortion rights groups oppose it on moral or religious grounds.

Now, Health and Human Services Secretary Xavier Becerra says he's reversing several restrictions on fetal tissue research put in place during the Trump administration.

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Updated April 14, 2021 at 4:26 PM ET

The Biden administration is moving to reverse a Trump-era family planning policy that critics describe as a domestic "gag rule" for reproductive healthcare providers.

Jared Cornutt has heard some farfetched concerns about the coronavirus vaccine in some of his Southern Baptist Facebook groups.

"I have a very hard time getting from vaccine to the Mark of the Beast," Cornutt said, referring to one baseless rumor that linked vaccination requirements to an idea in Revelation, the apocalyptic book at the end of the New Testament.

Balaram Khamari is a doctoral student in microbiology who has always felt the connection between science and art.

"They are interlinked," he says. "Even doing a science experiment requires art."

Now, Khamari is bringing the worlds of art and science together – in a petri dish. He's been spending a lot of time in his lab in Puttaparthi, India, culturing colorful bacteria and artfully arranging it on a jelly like substance called agar. He is part of a growing body of scientists across the world who make agar art, and even compete for prizes.

In 2003, the rock group Evanescence released their debut album, Fallen – which went on to sell more than 17 million copies worldwide and win two Grammys, while hit singles such as "Bring Me to Life" and "My Immortal" remain anthems for angsty teenagers. Now, almost a decade since their last album of original material, Evanescence is back with a new album, The Bitter Truth. The group's co-founder and lead singer, Amy Lee, is more than ready to spill the truth on why it took so long to release this album.

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Republicans picked up seats in statehouses across the country in November. And now, they are using those gains to push new abortion restrictions, some of which resemble laws previously blocked by the courts. NPR's Sarah McCammon reports.

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