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Regional Interests

Through The Eyes of Women - Helping Small Children Who Are Soon To Become Big Siblings

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Bringing home a new baby means change for everyone, and parenting books tend to tell parents how to help siblings adjust – but – What does it look like from their point of view?

Author Elizabeth Rusch talks to Brenda Starr about getting this new relationship off on the right foot. 

 
Anna and Oliver, big siblings extraordinaire, are here to tell you all about what to expect when your family is expecting—and what life will really be like once a new baby arrives. The dynamic duo cover everything from naptime to stinky diapers and from holding the baby to deciphering your baby’s body language. They even offer up helpful ideas for parents on how to make life as a big brother or sister as filled with fun—and love—as it can be!
 
So, get ready…get set…time to welcome a new baby!
 
Elizabeth Rusch is an award-winning freelance writer and former managing editor of Teacher magazine, editor-in- chief of PointsBeyond.com, and contributing editor to Child and Fit Pregnancy. She has published more than 100 articles in numerous national magazines for adults and children. She’s traveled to the oil fields of southern California to report on townspeople who rebelled against computer use in their school. She has interviewed national experts on tons of topics, from the childhood asthma epidemic to how understanding microclimates can help you choose a campsite. She even wore the same pair of hiking socks for 10 days straight, without washing, for a gear review for Backpacker magazine. These days, Liz is focusing on narrative nonfiction, science, art, and travel writing, humor, and essays. Liz loves where she lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband, two terrific kids, and one very funny, quirky dog named Reba.

Illustrator Qin Leng was born in Shanghai, China, and later moved to France and then Montreal, Canada. She now lives in Toronto, Canada, with her twin sister and works as a designer and illustrator. Her father, an artist himself, was a great influence on her. She grew up surrounded by paintings, and it became second nature for her to express herself through art. Qin graduated from the Mel Hoppenheim School of Cinema and has received many awards for her animated short films and other works. From very early on, she has loved to portray the innocence of children and has developed a passion for children’s books.

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