Seeking action and resolution with art, performance

Listen to the Tuesday, Oct. 9 Artwaves for continued coverage of the premier Against the Wind Festival , created by local volunteers to draw attention to the danger of nuclear proliferation as well as raise money for the multiple-year voyage of the Golden Rule "peace boat." The festival will be held this Sunday, Oct. 14 through Sunday, Oct. 21. Wendy Butler speaks with John Heckel who directs the festival's centerpiece, the 1959 play "Which Way the Wind?" with performances Oct. 19-21 at Arcata Playhouse. Also on the Oct. 9 Artwaves is an interview with Dr. Cutcha Risling Baldy, who speaks about the Sing Our Rivers Red traveling earring exhibition at the HSU Goudi’ni Gallery. SORR’s events seek to “bring awareness to the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women and colonial gender-based violence” across North America. There are also connected events occurring with this exhibit including a Sewing Circle tomorrow (Wednesday) at 10 a.m. and Thursday at 2 p.m. and a Gallery Talk this Friday, Oct. 12 at noon. Phone the gallery office at (707) 826-3629, email hsugalleries@gmail.com or bs228@humboldt.edu for more information.

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Los Angeles artist Anthony Ausgang’s works are part of an exhibit titled “Hollywood to the Redwoods” on display at Black Faun Gallery through September 29. Ausgang is this week’s guest on Artwaves. He speaks with Wendy Butler about the “cartoon universe” he’s created of which cats are a notable part. The various nonhuman scenes are nonetheless statements about very human fears and aspirations.


Judy Collins is coming to Humboldt County on September 30th. She'll be performing with longtime friend Stephen Stills in the Arkley Center for the Performing Arts.

Danielle Orr caught up with Judy via phone to discuss music, art and learning to celebrate and laugh everyday.


HSU Campus Dialogue on Race Seeks Submissions

Sep 17, 2018

HSU Library Media Coordinator Kumi Watanabe-Shock came by the KHSU Magazine to talk about the 20th Annual HSU Campus & Community Dialogue on Race, which will take place October 29 – November 2. The Campus Dialogue on Race is currently accepting proposals for workshops which invite students, staff, faculty, administrators, and community members to present and attend programs that relate to racial justice and its intersections with all forms of oppression and resistance. Deadline to submit: Thursday, Sept. 27 @ 4pm.


KHSU

Humboldt's artistic vibrancy is on seen late at night on stages across the county. Lost Coast Sessions brings a slice of that scene to you, complete with a live studio audience. 

An activist mom, her activist son and a celebration for a passionate young man. 

Forest activists, community members, musicians and artists will gather at the Historic Eagle House in Old Town, Eureka on Sunday, September 16 for a 20th Anniversary Memorial for David “Gypsy” Chain.  The event is a fundraiser for a scholarship in memory of the young man who lost his life while trying to prevent illegal logging near Grizzly Creek in the Van Duzen River watershed. 


HA Foundation

Lindsie Bear is the new program director for the Native Cultures Fund at Humboldt Area Foundation. Lindsie and her family recently joined the north coast community from the bay area. She previously worked with HeyDay Press, an independent, nonprofit publisher that promotes awareness and celebration of California’s many cultures, landscapes, and boundary-breaking ideas. 

Lindsie spoke with Jessica Eden about her new role and the community strengthening work she's delighted to be a part of.


ILLUSTRATION JACQUI LANGELAND / North Coast Journal

"They really love this work. There are a lot of hard things about it -- it doesn't pay terrifically -- but they really love it. And I think its largely because they are people people." North Coast Journal editor Jennifer Fumiko Cahill, talks about the restauarant and bar servers she spoke to for the cover story in this week's issue, "Dishing it Out."

Surly customers, great experiences, bad tips, and a love of people, Fumiko Cahill previews it all. Oh, and no touching...ever.

EPA Considers Mine in Hoopa for Superfund Cleanup

Sep 13, 2018
Natalya Estrada

Yellow tinted water flows out of a mine shaft located below a small stretch of Highway 96. It’s part of the discharge from the now defunct Copper Bluff Mine, which is on tribal land. Ken Norton, Hoopa Valley Tribal member and director for the Tribal Environmental Protection Agency, says that although the mine was shut down in 1964, chemicals are still flowing directly into the Trinity River.

“The discharge that comes out of the mine entrance has been evaluated for concentrations of selenium, cadmium, mercury, arsenic and high levels of acidity," Norton says. 

Natalya Estrada

Close to 100 people stood at the edge of Harrison Avenue, near St. Joseph Hospital in Eureka on Monday, to protest what’s considered a staffing crisis by the National Union of Healthcare Workers and the California Nurses Association.

On the latest Artwaves broadcast Wendy Butler speaks with Arcata-based professional career counselor Susan Abbott about her career development seminars that she's offering through HSU's College of Extended Education and Global Engagement and through her own career services business. Creativity is the centerpiece of these seminars for artists and nonartists. 


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From NPR

President Trump warned at his rally in Pennsylvania on Wednesday night that if his party loses in November's midterm elections, the "radical Democrat mob" will take away everything he's achieved since his election, while encouraging crime and socialism.

It was an echo of a tweet he sent over the weekend and used again at a rally in Iowa on Tuesday — giving rise to a line that Republicans have been quick to seize upon as they try to sustain a newly-enthused GOP base in the wake of the divisive confirmation battle for now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

Copyright 2018 KQED. To see more, visit KQED.

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